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Article

Increased Electrical Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Fibers by Thermal and Voltage Annealing

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Energy Safety Research Institute, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
2
Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA
3
Department of Physics, Singleton Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
4
SPECIFIC, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
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Arizona Institutes for Resilience (AIR), University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
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Department of Materials Science and Nanoengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA
7
Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Brunei, Jalan Tungku Link, Gadong BE1410, Brunei
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gil Goncalves
Received: 6 November 2021 / Revised: 12 December 2021 / Accepted: 20 December 2021 / Published: 23 December 2021
We report the effect of annealing, both electrical and by applied voltage, on the electrical conductivity of fibers spun from carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Commercial CNT fibers were used as part of a larger goal to better understand the factors that go into making a better electrical conductor from CNT fibers. A study of thermal annealing in a vacuum up to 800 °C was performed on smaller fiber sections along with a separate analysis of voltage annealing up to 7 VDC; both exhibited a sweet spot in the process as determined by a combination of a two-point probe measurement with a nanoprobe, resonant Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Scaled-up tests were then performed in order to translate these results into bulk samples inside a tube furnace, with similar results that indicate the potential for an optimized method of achieving a better conductor sample made from CNT fibers. The results also help to determine the surface effects that need to be overcome in order to achieve this. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbon; carbon nanotube; electrical conductor; annealing; energy carbon; carbon nanotube; electrical conductor; annealing; energy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gangoli, V.S.; Barnett, C.J.; McGettrick, J.D.; Orbaek White, A.; Barron, A.R. Increased Electrical Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Fibers by Thermal and Voltage Annealing. C 2022, 8, 1. https://doi.org/10.3390/c8010001

AMA Style

Gangoli VS, Barnett CJ, McGettrick JD, Orbaek White A, Barron AR. Increased Electrical Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Fibers by Thermal and Voltage Annealing. C. 2022; 8(1):1. https://doi.org/10.3390/c8010001

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gangoli, Varun S., Chris J. Barnett, James D. McGettrick, Alvin Orbaek White, and Andrew R. Barron. 2022. "Increased Electrical Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Fibers by Thermal and Voltage Annealing" C 8, no. 1: 1. https://doi.org/10.3390/c8010001

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