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Review

Characterization of Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Storage and Compression

1
Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, F-88000 Epinal, France
2
Institute of Separation Science and Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (CBI), Friedrich-Alexander-University, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 June 2020 / Revised: 3 July 2020 / Accepted: 7 July 2020 / Published: 9 July 2020
Carbon materials have proven to be a suitable choice for hydrogen storage and, recently, for hydrogen compression. Their developed textural properties, such as large surface area and high microporosity, are essential features for hydrogen adsorption. In this work, we first review recent advances in the physisorption characterization of nanoporous carbon materials. Among them, approaches based on the density functional theory are considered now standard methods for obtaining a reliable assessment of the pore size distribution (PSD) over the whole range from narrow micropores to mesopores. Both a high surface area and ultramicropores (pore width < 0.7 nm) are needed to achieve significant hydrogen adsorption at pressures below 1 MPa and 77 K. However, due to the wide PSD typical of activated carbons, it follows from an extensive literature review that pressures above 3 MP are needed to reach maximum excess uptakes in the range of ca. 7 wt.%. Finally, we present the adsorption–desorption compression technology, allowing hydrogen to be compressed at 70 MPa by cooling/heating cycles between 77 and 298 K, and being an alternative to mechanical compressors. The cyclic, thermally driven hydrogen compression might open a new scenario within the vast field of hydrogen applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical adsorption; characterization; hydrogen storage; hydrogen compression physical adsorption; characterization; hydrogen storage; hydrogen compression
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sdanghi, G.; Canevesi, R.L.S.; Celzard, A.; Thommes, M.; Fierro, V. Characterization of Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Storage and Compression. C 2020, 6, 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/c6030046

AMA Style

Sdanghi G, Canevesi RLS, Celzard A, Thommes M, Fierro V. Characterization of Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Storage and Compression. C. 2020; 6(3):46. https://doi.org/10.3390/c6030046

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sdanghi, Giuseppe, Rafael L.S. Canevesi, Alain Celzard, Matthias Thommes, and Vanessa Fierro. 2020. "Characterization of Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Storage and Compression" C 6, no. 3: 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/c6030046

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