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J. Fungi 2016, 2(3), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof2030020

Correction
Correction: Kwon-Chung, K.J. et al. Is Cryptococcus gattii a Primary Pathogen? J. Fungi 2015, 1, 154–167
1
Molecular Microbiology Section, Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
2
Second Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University Hospital, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki-city 851-8501, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: John R. Perfect
Received: 20 June 2016 / Accepted: 30 June 2016 / Published: 5 July 2016
The authors of the published paper [1] would like to correct Table 1. The third line in the first column should have been 20 (normal volunteers) and the etiologic agent in the second column should have been “None” instead of C. gattii, VGI. Therefore, Table 1 should read as follows:
We apologize for any inconvenience caused to readers.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Reference

  1. Kwon-Chung, K.J.; Saijo, T. Is Cryptococcus gattii a Primary Pathogen? J. Fungi 2015, 1, 154–167. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
Table 1. Detection of anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies in plasma from Chinese immunocompetent, otherwise healthy Cryptococcosis patients with CNS infection [26].
Table 1. Detection of anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies in plasma from Chinese immunocompetent, otherwise healthy Cryptococcosis patients with CNS infection [26].
No. Patient SamplesEtiologic AgentAnti-GM-CSF AB
20C. neoformans, VNl, VNlll0
1C. gattii, VGl1
20 (Normal volunteers)None1
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