Next Article in Journal
Challenges and Solutions for Commercial Scale Manufacturing of Allogeneic Pluripotent Stem Cell Products
Next Article in Special Issue
3D Bioprinting Strategies for the Regeneration of Functional Tubular Tissues and Organs
Previous Article in Journal
PHA Production and PHA Synthases of the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas sp. SF2003
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nanocellulose-Based Inks—Effect of Alginate Content on the Water Absorption of 3D Printed Constructs
Open AccessArticle

3D Printing of Gelled and Cross-Linked Cellulose Solutions; an Exploration of Printing Parameters and Gel Behaviour

1
School of Product Design, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
2
Biomolecular Interaction Centre, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
4
Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Bioengineering 2020, 7(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7020030
Received: 19 February 2020 / Revised: 24 March 2020 / Accepted: 25 March 2020 / Published: 27 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocomposite Inks for 3D Printing)
In recent years, 3D printing has enabled the fabrication of complex designs, with low-cost customization and an ever-increasing range of materials. Yet, these abilities have also created an enormous challenge in optimizing a large number of process parameters, especially in the 3D printing of swellable, non-toxic, biocompatible and biodegradable materials, so-called bio-ink materials. In this work, a cellulose gel, made out of aqueous solutions of cellulose, sodium hydroxide and urea, was used to demonstrate the formation of a shear thinning bio-ink material necessary for an extrusion-based 3D printing. After analysing the shear thinning behaviour of the cellulose gel by rheometry a Design of Experiments (DoE) was applied to optimize the 3D bioprinter settings for printing the cellulose gel. The optimum print settings were then used to print a human ear shape, without a need for support material. The results clearly indicate that the found settings allow the printing of more complex parts with high-fidelity. This confirms the capability of the applied method to 3D print a newly developed bio-ink material. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioprinting; cellulose; hydrogel; physical cross-linking bioprinting; cellulose; hydrogel; physical cross-linking
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Huber, T.; Najaf Zadeh, H.; Feast, S.; Roughan, T.; Fee, C. 3D Printing of Gelled and Cross-Linked Cellulose Solutions; an Exploration of Printing Parameters and Gel Behaviour. Bioengineering 2020, 7, 30. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7020030

AMA Style

Huber T, Najaf Zadeh H, Feast S, Roughan T, Fee C. 3D Printing of Gelled and Cross-Linked Cellulose Solutions; an Exploration of Printing Parameters and Gel Behaviour. Bioengineering. 2020; 7(2):30. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7020030

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huber, Tim; Najaf Zadeh, Hossein; Feast, Sean; Roughan, Thea; Fee, Conan. 2020. "3D Printing of Gelled and Cross-Linked Cellulose Solutions; an Exploration of Printing Parameters and Gel Behaviour" Bioengineering 7, no. 2: 30. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7020030

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop