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Open AccessArticle

Cannabidiol Content and In Vitro Biological Activities of Commercial Cannabidiol Oils and Hemp Seed Oils

1
Laboratory of Pharmacognocy, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai University, 1–1, Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0295, Japan
2
Research and Development, Morinda Worldwide, Inc., Morinda Bldg., 3-2-2 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0023, Japan
3
Research and Development, Morinda Inc., 737 East 1180 South, American Fork, UT 84003, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicines 2020, 7(9), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines7090057
Received: 28 July 2020 / Revised: 17 August 2020 / Accepted: 4 September 2020 / Published: 7 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Applications of the Cannabis Plant)
Background: Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seed contains high contents of various nutrients, including fatty acids and proteins. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive compound that can be extracted from C. sativa and used for treating epilepsy and pain. Industrial hemp products, including CBD and hemp seed oils, have become increasingly popular. Some products are marketed without a clear distinction between CBD and hemp seed oils. Herein, the CBD content and biological activities of commercial CBD and hemp seed oils were examined. Methods: CBD content was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. For in vitro antioxidant activity determination, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2′-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical-scavenging assays were performed. Results: The CBD concentrations in the two CBD oil samples were 18.9 ± 0.5 and 9.2 ± 0.4 mg/mL. Of the seven hemp seed oil samples, six samples contained CBD in concentrations ranging from 2.0 ± 0.1 to 20.5 ± 0.5 µg/mL, but it was not detected in one sample. Antioxidant activity was observed in both CBD oil samples. Conclusions: The results indicate that (1) CBD content varied by hemp seed oil sample and that (2) antioxidant activity could be a useful landmark for discriminating CBD oils from hemp seed oils. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cannabidiol; hemp; antioxidant; Cannabis sativa Cannabidiol; hemp; antioxidant; Cannabis sativa
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kitamura, M.; Kiba, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Tomida, N.; Uwaya, A.; Isami, F.; Deng, S. Cannabidiol Content and In Vitro Biological Activities of Commercial Cannabidiol Oils and Hemp Seed Oils. Medicines 2020, 7, 57. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines7090057

AMA Style

Kitamura M, Kiba Y, Suzuki R, Tomida N, Uwaya A, Isami F, Deng S. Cannabidiol Content and In Vitro Biological Activities of Commercial Cannabidiol Oils and Hemp Seed Oils. Medicines. 2020; 7(9):57. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines7090057

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kitamura, Masashi; Kiba, Yuka; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Tomida, Natsumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Deng, Shixin. 2020. "Cannabidiol Content and In Vitro Biological Activities of Commercial Cannabidiol Oils and Hemp Seed Oils" Medicines 7, no. 9: 57. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines7090057

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