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Short-Term Traffic-Related Exposures and Biomarkers of Nitro-PAH Exposure and Oxidative DNA Damage

1
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, UC Berkeley School of Public Health, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
3
Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Section, VA Boston Healthcare System, West Roxbury, MA 02132, USA
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
5
Nicholas School of the Environment, and Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
6
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's and Hospital Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxics 2014, 2(3), 377-390; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics2030377
Received: 12 May 2014 / Revised: 27 June 2014 / Accepted: 11 July 2014 / Published: 22 July 2014
Exposure to vehicle exhaust has been associated with cardiac and respiratory disease, lung cancer and greater overall mortality. We investigated whether amino-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (amino-PAH) metabolites of nitro-PAHs could be used as biomarkers of these exposures. Pre- and post-shift urine samples were collected at the beginning and end of a work week from 82 male U.S. trucking industry workers. We used repeated-measures analysis to examine associations of total 1- and 2-aminonaphthalene (1 & 2-AN) and 1-aminopyrene (1-AP) urinary concentrations with microenvironment exposures to particulate matter (PM2.5), elemental and organic carbon and between 1 & 2-AN and 1-AP with urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). There was an association between work week mean PM2.5 levels and post-shift 1 & 2-AN (141.8 pg/mL increase (95% CI: 53.3, 230.2) for each IQR increase (5.54 µg/m3) in PM2.5), but no associations with other exposure measures. There was a statistically significant increase in 8-OHdG concentrations with 1 & 2-AN (2.38 µg/mg creatinine (95% CI: 0.19, 4.58) per 242.85 pg/mg creatinine increase in 1 & 2-AN) and suggestive associations with all other exposure measures. Our findings suggest associations between urinary amino-PAHs with vehicle exhaust-related PM2.5, as well as with a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage. View Full-Text
Keywords: traffic emissions; nitro-PAHs; biomarkers; oxidative stress traffic emissions; nitro-PAHs; biomarkers; oxidative stress
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MDPI and ACS Style

Neophytou, A.M.; Hart, J.E.; Chang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Smith, T.J.; Garshick, E.; Laden, F. Short-Term Traffic-Related Exposures and Biomarkers of Nitro-PAH Exposure and Oxidative DNA Damage. Toxics 2014, 2, 377-390. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics2030377

AMA Style

Neophytou AM, Hart JE, Chang Y, Zhang J, Smith TJ, Garshick E, Laden F. Short-Term Traffic-Related Exposures and Biomarkers of Nitro-PAH Exposure and Oxidative DNA Damage. Toxics. 2014; 2(3):377-390. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics2030377

Chicago/Turabian Style

Neophytou, Andreas M.; Hart, Jaime E.; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng; Smith, Thomas J.; Garshick, Eric; Laden, Francine. 2014. "Short-Term Traffic-Related Exposures and Biomarkers of Nitro-PAH Exposure and Oxidative DNA Damage" Toxics 2, no. 3: 377-390. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics2030377

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