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Open AccessArticle

Chemical Composition of Wild Fallow Deer (Dama Dama) Meat from South Africa: A Preliminary Evaluation

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Department of Animal Sciences, Faculty of AgriSciences, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7600, South Africa
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School of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, University of Mpumalanga, Cnr R40 and D725 Roads, Nelspruit 1200, South Africa
3
Department of Animal Science and Food Processing, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, 165 00 Prague 6-Suchdol, Czech Republic
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Department of Ethology, Institute of Animal Science, 104 00 Prague 10-Uhříněves, Czech Republic
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Department of Food Science, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, 165 00 Prague 6-Suchdol, Czech Republic
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Department of Cattle Breeding, Institute of Animal Science, 104 00 Prague 10-Uhříněves, Czech Republic
7
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, Coopers Plains, QLD 4108, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
This manuscript is based on work included in the thesis of Leon Brett Fitzhenry (second author) presented for the degree of Masters of Science in Animal Science at the University of Stellenbosch (http://scholar.sun.ac.za/handle/10019.1/984020). Some similarity between the two sources is therefore inevitable.
Foods 2020, 9(5), 598; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050598
Received: 28 February 2020 / Revised: 30 March 2020 / Accepted: 8 April 2020 / Published: 7 May 2020
Although fallow deer are abundant in South Africa, these cervids remain undervalued as a domestic protein source and little information exists on their meat quality. This study aimed to evaluate the proximate and mineral compositions of the meat from wild fallow deer (n = 6 male, n = 6 female) harvested in South Africa, as affected by sex and muscle. Proximate analyses were conducted on six muscles (longissimus thoracis et lumborum [LTL], biceps femoris [BF], semimembranosus [SM], semitendinosus [ST], infraspinatus [IS], supraspinatus [SS]), whereas mineral analyses were conducted on the LTL and BF. The proximate composition of the muscles ranged from 73.3–76.2% moisture, 20.4–23.1% protein, 2.2–3.2% fat, and 1.1–1.5% ash. Proximate composition was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) influenced by muscle, but not by sex. The primary essential macro- and micro-minerals determined in the LTL and BF were potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and magnesium, as well as iron, zinc, and copper, with more variation in concentrations occurring with muscle than with sex. Minerals in the muscles contributing most notably to human recommended dietary requirements were potassium, iron, copper, and zinc. These findings indicate that wild fallow deer meat is a nutritious food source and should enhance utilisation of such products. View Full-Text
Keywords: fat; moisture; minerals; protein; proximate composition; venison fat; moisture; minerals; protein; proximate composition; venison
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cawthorn, D.-M.; Fitzhenry, L.B.; Kotrba, R.; Bureš, D.; Hoffman, L.C. Chemical Composition of Wild Fallow Deer (Dama Dama) Meat from South Africa: A Preliminary Evaluation. Foods 2020, 9, 598.

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