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Article

UV-C Irradiation of Rolled Fillets of Ham Inoculated with Yersinia enterocolitica and Brochothrix thermosphacta

1
Institute for Food Quality and Food Safety, Foundation University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover, Germany
2
Institute for Veterinary Food Science, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Frankfurter Str. 92, 35392 Giessen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(5), 552; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050552
Received: 20 March 2020 / Revised: 17 April 2020 / Accepted: 29 April 2020 / Published: 1 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Food Quality and Safety)
Bacteria on ready-to-eat meat may cause diseases and lead to faster deterioration of the product. In this study, ready-to-eat sliced ham samples were inoculated with Yersinia enterocolitica or Brochothrix thermosphacta and treated with ultraviolet (UV) light. The initial effect of a UV-C irradiation was investigated with doses of 408, 2040, 4080, and 6120 mJ/cm2 and the effect after 0, 7, and 14 days of refrigerated storage with doses of 408 and 4080 mJ/cm2. Furthermore, inoculated ham samples were stored under light and dark conditions after the UV-C treatment to investigate the effect of photoreactivation. To assess the ham quality the parameters color and antioxidant capacity were analyzed during storage. UV-C light reduced Yersinia enterocolitica and Brochothrix thermosphacta counts by up to 1.11 log10 and 0.79 log10 colony forming units/g, respectively, during storage. No photoreactivation of the bacteria was observed. Furthermore, significantly lower a* and higher b* values after 7 and 14 days of storage and a significantly higher antioxidant capacity on day 0 after treatment with 4080 mJ/cm2 were detected. However, there were no other significant differences between treated and untreated samples. Hence, a UV-C treatment can reduce microbial surface contamination of ready-to-eat sliced ham without causing considerable quality changes. View Full-Text
Keywords: ham; ultraviolet irradiation; photoreactivation; Yersinia enterocolitica; Brochothrix thermosphacta ham; ultraviolet irradiation; photoreactivation; Yersinia enterocolitica; Brochothrix thermosphacta
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MDPI and ACS Style

Reichel, J.; Kehrenberg, C.; Krischek, C. UV-C Irradiation of Rolled Fillets of Ham Inoculated with Yersinia enterocolitica and Brochothrix thermosphacta. Foods 2020, 9, 552. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050552

AMA Style

Reichel J, Kehrenberg C, Krischek C. UV-C Irradiation of Rolled Fillets of Ham Inoculated with Yersinia enterocolitica and Brochothrix thermosphacta. Foods. 2020; 9(5):552. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050552

Chicago/Turabian Style

Reichel, Julia, Corinna Kehrenberg, and Carsten Krischek. 2020. "UV-C Irradiation of Rolled Fillets of Ham Inoculated with Yersinia enterocolitica and Brochothrix thermosphacta" Foods 9, no. 5: 552. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050552

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