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Foods 2018, 7(7), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7070111

Nutrition Transition and Traditional Food Cultural Changes in Sri Lanka during Colonization and Post-Colonization

1
Section of Organic Food Quality and Food Culture, Faculty of Organic Agricultural Sciences, University of Kassel, 34125 Kassel, Germany
2
Department of Archaeology and Heritage Management, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Anuradhapura 50000, Sri Lanka
3
Department of Agricultural Systems, Faculty of Agriculture, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Anuradhapura 50000, Sri Lanka
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 May 2018 / Revised: 1 July 2018 / Accepted: 10 July 2018 / Published: 13 July 2018
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Abstract

Sri Lanka was a colony of the Portuguese, Dutch, and British. The simplification of Sri Lankan food culture can be seen most clearly today, including how the diet has been changed in the last 400 years since the colonial occupation began. Therefore, greater efforts must be made to uncover the colonial forces that have undermined food security and health in Sri Lanka. Also traditional eating habits, which are associated with countless health benefits, have been gradually replaced by the globalized food system of multinational corporations and hidden hunger, a system inherent in the emergence of non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, cholesterol, and kidney disease epidemics, in Sri Lanka. This article discusses factors that have underpinned the dietary change in Sri Lanka from its early colonization to the post-colonization period. The research followed the integrated concept in ethnological and sociological study approaches. The study examined literature and conducted several interviews with field experts and senior people in marginal areas in Sri Lanka. This study examines the Sri Lankan traditional food system and how it changed after the colonial period, including the main changes and their impact on current micronutrient deficiencies and non-communicable diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: food transition; food habit; westernization; dietary patterns; health impact food transition; food habit; westernization; dietary patterns; health impact
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Weerasekara, P.C.; Withanachchi, C.R.; Ginigaddara, G.A.S.; Ploeger, A. Nutrition Transition and Traditional Food Cultural Changes in Sri Lanka during Colonization and Post-Colonization. Foods 2018, 7, 111.

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