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Article

The Russia-Ukraine Conflict: Its Implications for the Global Food Supply Chains

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Sustainable Manufacturing Systems Centre, School of Aerospace, Transport & Manufacturing, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL, UK
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Department of Work, Employment, Management and Organisations, School of Business, The University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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Glenfield Hospital, University Hospitals of Leicester, NHS Trust, Leicester LE3 9QP, UK
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Department of Agrifood System Economics, Centre ‘Camino de Purchil’, Institute of Agricultural and Fisheries Research and Training (IFAPA), 18080 Granada, Spain
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Faculty of Business and Law, The University of the West of England, Bristol BS16 1QY, UK
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National Centre for Food Manufacturing, University of Lincoln, Holbeach PE12 7PT, UK
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Centro Tecnológico de la Carne de Galicia, Rúa Galicia n 4, Parque Tecnológico de Galicia, San Cibrao das Viñas, 32900 Ourense, Spain
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Area de Tecnoloxía dos Alimentos, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo, 32004 Ourense, Spain
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Agri-Food Sustainability Assessment, University de Lorraine, 54600 Nancy, France
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Sustainable AgriFoodTech Innovation & Research (SAFIR), 62000 Arras, France
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Syrian Academic Expertise (SAE), Gaziantep 27200, Turkey
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Juan Manuel Ramon Jeronimo and Raquel Flórez López
Foods 2022, 11(14), 2098; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142098
Received: 13 May 2022 / Revised: 29 June 2022 / Accepted: 8 July 2022 / Published: 14 July 2022
Food is one of the most traded goods, and the conflict in Ukraine, one of the European breadbaskets, has triggered a significant additional disruption in the global food supply chains after the COVID-19 impact. The disruption to food output, supply chains, availability, and affordability could have a long-standing impact. As a result, the availability and supply of a wide range of food raw materials and finished food products are under threat, and global markets have seen recent increases in food prices. Furthermore, the Russian-Ukrainian conflict has adversely affected food supply chains, with significant effects on production, sourcing, manufacturing, processing, logistics, and significant shifts in demand between nations reliant on imports from Ukraine. This paper aims to analyze the impacts of the conflict between Russia and Ukraine on the effectiveness and responsiveness of the global food supply chains. A PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) approach, including grey literature, was deployed to investigate six key areas of the food supply chains that would be impacted most due to the ongoing war. Findings include solutions and strategies to mitigate supply chain impacts such as alternative food raw materials, suppliers and supply chain partners supported by technological innovations to ensure food safety and quality in warlike situations. View Full-Text
Keywords: conflict; consumer; food processing; food production; food logistics; food quality; food storage; food supply chain; Russia; Ukraine; war conflict; consumer; food processing; food production; food logistics; food quality; food storage; food supply chain; Russia; Ukraine; war
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jagtap, S.; Trollman, H.; Trollman, F.; Garcia-Garcia, G.; Parra-López, C.; Duong, L.; Martindale, W.; Munekata, P.E.S.; Lorenzo, J.M.; Hdaifeh, A.; Hassoun, A.; Salonitis, K.; Afy-Shararah, M. The Russia-Ukraine Conflict: Its Implications for the Global Food Supply Chains. Foods 2022, 11, 2098. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142098

AMA Style

Jagtap S, Trollman H, Trollman F, Garcia-Garcia G, Parra-López C, Duong L, Martindale W, Munekata PES, Lorenzo JM, Hdaifeh A, Hassoun A, Salonitis K, Afy-Shararah M. The Russia-Ukraine Conflict: Its Implications for the Global Food Supply Chains. Foods. 2022; 11(14):2098. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142098

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jagtap, Sandeep, Hana Trollman, Frank Trollman, Guillermo Garcia-Garcia, Carlos Parra-López, Linh Duong, Wayne Martindale, Paulo E. S. Munekata, Jose M. Lorenzo, Ammar Hdaifeh, Abdo Hassoun, Konstantinos Salonitis, and Mohamed Afy-Shararah. 2022. "The Russia-Ukraine Conflict: Its Implications for the Global Food Supply Chains" Foods 11, no. 14: 2098. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142098

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