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Review

ASSURED Point-of-Need Food Safety Screening: A Critical Assessment of Portable Food Analyzers

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Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zürich, Schmelzbergstrasse 9, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland
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CSEM SA, Center Landquart, Bahnhofstrasse 1, 7302 Landquart, Switzerland
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Nanobiotechnology for Diagnostics (Nb4D), Institute for Advanced Chemistry of Catalonia (IQAC) of the Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
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CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
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Wageningen Food Safety Research, Wageningen University and Research, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Department of Food Analysis and Nutrition, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Technická 5, Dejvice, 166 28 Prague 6, Czech Republic
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Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University, 19 Chlorine Gardens, Belfast BT9 5DL, UK
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Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen, The Netherlands
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Philippe Delahaut and Riccardo Marega
Foods 2021, 10(6), 1399; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061399
Received: 19 April 2021 / Revised: 7 June 2021 / Accepted: 12 June 2021 / Published: 17 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Analytical Methods in Food Analysis)
Standard methods for chemical food safety testing in official laboratories rely largely on liquid or gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Although these methods are considered the gold standard for quantitative confirmatory analysis, they require sampling, transferring the samples to a central laboratory to be tested by highly trained personnel, and the use of expensive equipment. Therefore, there is an increasing demand for portable and handheld devices to provide rapid, efficient, and on-site screening of food contaminants. Recent technological advancements in the field include smartphone-based, microfluidic chip-based, and paper-based devices integrated with electrochemical and optical biosensing platforms. Furthermore, the potential application of portable mass spectrometers in food testing might bring the confirmatory analysis from the laboratory to the field in the future. Although such systems open new promising possibilities for portable food testing, few of these devices are commercially available. To understand why barriers remain, portable food analyzers reported in the literature over the last ten years were reviewed. To this end, the analytical performance of these devices and the extent they match the World Health Organization benchmark for diagnostic tests, i.e., the Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User-friendly, Rapid and Robust, Equipment-free, and Deliverable to end-users (ASSURED) criteria, was evaluated critically. A five-star scoring system was used to assess their potential to be implemented as food safety testing systems. The main findings highlight the need for concentrated efforts towards combining the best features of different technologies, to bridge technological gaps and meet commercialization requirements. View Full-Text
Keywords: food safety; portable food analyzer; point-of-need; ASSURED criteria; portable mass spectrometer; optical biosensor; electrochemical biosensor; microfluidic device; lab-on-a-chip; smartphone-based biosensor food safety; portable food analyzer; point-of-need; ASSURED criteria; portable mass spectrometer; optical biosensor; electrochemical biosensor; microfluidic device; lab-on-a-chip; smartphone-based biosensor
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jafari, S.; Guercetti, J.; Geballa-Koukoula, A.; Tsagkaris, A.S.; Nelis, J.L.D.; Marco, M.-P.; Salvador, J.-P.; Gerssen, A.; Hajslova, J.; Elliott, C.; Campbell, K.; Migliorelli, D.; Burr, L.; Generelli, S.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Sturla, S.J. ASSURED Point-of-Need Food Safety Screening: A Critical Assessment of Portable Food Analyzers. Foods 2021, 10, 1399. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061399

AMA Style

Jafari S, Guercetti J, Geballa-Koukoula A, Tsagkaris AS, Nelis JLD, Marco M-P, Salvador J-P, Gerssen A, Hajslova J, Elliott C, Campbell K, Migliorelli D, Burr L, Generelli S, Nielen MWF, Sturla SJ. ASSURED Point-of-Need Food Safety Screening: A Critical Assessment of Portable Food Analyzers. Foods. 2021; 10(6):1399. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061399

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jafari, Safiye, Julian Guercetti, Ariadni Geballa-Koukoula, Aristeidis S. Tsagkaris, Joost L.D. Nelis, M.-Pilar Marco, J.-Pablo Salvador, Arjen Gerssen, Jana Hajslova, Chris Elliott, Katrina Campbell, Davide Migliorelli, Loïc Burr, Silvia Generelli, Michel W.F. Nielen, and Shana J. Sturla. 2021. "ASSURED Point-of-Need Food Safety Screening: A Critical Assessment of Portable Food Analyzers" Foods 10, no. 6: 1399. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061399

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