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Article

Alternative Methods for Measuring the Susceptibility of White Wines to Pinking Alteration: Derivative Spectroscopy and CIEL*a*b* Colour Analysis

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Giottoconsulting srl, 31051 Follina, Italy
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CQ-VR—Chemistry Research Center—Vila Real, Food and Wine Chemistry Laboratory, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chrysoula Tassou
Foods 2021, 10(3), 553; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030553
Received: 8 February 2021 / Revised: 26 February 2021 / Accepted: 1 March 2021 / Published: 7 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Food Analytical Methods)
Pinking is the term used for describing the pink colouration that appears in white wines produced under reducing conditions when oxidised. The ability to predict the susceptibility of white wines for pinking is of utmost importance for wine producers. In this work, we critically compare the two most currently used methods for measuring pinking susceptibility and the use of the first derivative spectra and the CIEL*a*b* colour space method. The amplitude of the first derivative spectra in the 450–550 nm range has a good correlation with the values obtained by subtracting the extrapolate background at 500 nm (R2 = 0.927); therefore, first derivative spectroscopy seems to be a more straightforward approach for eliminating the background problem that occurs in this method. The CIEL*a*b* method using the a* value after oxidation seems to be the most appropriate method to measure the pinking susceptibility of white wines, showing a very good correlation with the amplitude of the first derivative spectra. The pink colouration visualisation is linearly related to the b* value of the white wine, showing that no universal cut-off value for predicting the pink visualisation should be used. Second derivative spectra allow the observation of the formation of different chromophores in wines after induced oxidation. View Full-Text
Keywords: pinking; white wine; derivative spectroscopy; CIEL*a*b* colour space pinking; white wine; derivative spectroscopy; CIEL*a*b* colour space
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MDPI and ACS Style

Minute, F.; Giotto, F.; Filipe-Ribeiro, L.; Cosme, F.; Nunes, F.M. Alternative Methods for Measuring the Susceptibility of White Wines to Pinking Alteration: Derivative Spectroscopy and CIEL*a*b* Colour Analysis. Foods 2021, 10, 553. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030553

AMA Style

Minute F, Giotto F, Filipe-Ribeiro L, Cosme F, Nunes FM. Alternative Methods for Measuring the Susceptibility of White Wines to Pinking Alteration: Derivative Spectroscopy and CIEL*a*b* Colour Analysis. Foods. 2021; 10(3):553. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030553

Chicago/Turabian Style

Minute, Fabrizio, Federico Giotto, Luís Filipe-Ribeiro, Fernanda Cosme, and Fernando M. Nunes 2021. "Alternative Methods for Measuring the Susceptibility of White Wines to Pinking Alteration: Derivative Spectroscopy and CIEL*a*b* Colour Analysis" Foods 10, no. 3: 553. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030553

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