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Rinse and Repeat: Understanding the Value of Replication across Different Ways of Knowing

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Department of Health, Ethics & Society, School of Primary Care and Public Health (CAPHRI), Maastricht University, PO Box 616, NL-6200MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Department of Humanities, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
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Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS), Leiden University, PO Box 905, NL-2300AX Leiden, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Publications 2019, 7(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7030052
Received: 21 March 2019 / Revised: 1 July 2019 / Accepted: 15 July 2019 / Published: 17 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers for Openness in Scholarly Publishing)
The increasing pursuit of replicable research and actual replication of research is a political project that articulates a very specific technology of accountability for science. This project was initiated in response to concerns about the openness and trustworthiness of science. Though applicable and valuable in many fields, here we argue that this value cannot be extended everywhere, since the epistemic content of fields, as well as their accountability infrastructures, differ. Furthermore, we argue that there are limits to replicability across all fields; but in some fields, including parts of the humanities, these limits severely undermine the value of replication to account for the value of research. View Full-Text
Keywords: Replicability; replication; reproducibility; reproduction; epistemic pluralism; accountability; humanities Replicability; replication; reproducibility; reproduction; epistemic pluralism; accountability; humanities
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Penders, B.; Holbrook, J.B.; de Rijcke, S. Rinse and Repeat: Understanding the Value of Replication across Different Ways of Knowing. Publications 2019, 7, 52.

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