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A Longitudinal Study on the Relationship of Oral Health at 4 Years of Age with That in Adulthood

1
Takenoyama Dental Clinic, Nissin 470-0136, Japan
2
College of Nursing Art and Science, University of Hyogo, Akashi 673-8588, Japan
3
Maxillofacial Unit, Oita Oka Hospital, Oita 870-0192, Japan
4
Division of Clinical Chemistry, Niigata University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata 951-8518, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dent. J. 2021, 9(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9020017
Received: 28 December 2020 / Revised: 18 January 2021 / Accepted: 23 January 2021 / Published: 1 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Oral Hygiene, Periodontology and Peri-implant Diseases)
This longitudinal study aimed to clarify the relationship of oral health in infancy with that in adulthood among participants who were the subjects of the oral health promotion project (OHPP) conducted in Miyako Island, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, since 1984. Twenty-seven subjects, around 35 years of age, were examined for dental caries, periodontal diseases (community periodontal index), dental plaque, occlusion, and bite-force and compared with those at 4 and 13–15 years of age. The dental caries status and maximum bite force in adulthood was significantly reflected for those at 4 and 13–15 years of age (p < 0.05). CPI in adulthood was related to the dental caries status at 4 and 13–15 years of age but not to the gingival score at 4 years of age, and it was weakly related to the gingival score at 13–15 years (r = 0.264, p > 0.05). Most of the normal occlusion at 4 years of age became normal permanent occlusion in adulthood (88.9%). Most of the cases involving the discrepancy factor retained the same condition in both the deciduous and permanent dentitions (83.3%) (p < 0.001). Those who participated in the OHPP soon after birth showed significantly fewer DMFT (p < 0.05) compared with those who did not. This study revealed that oral health at 4 years of age was related to that in adulthood, suggesting that fostering good oral health soon after birth is of great importance. View Full-Text
Keywords: oral health; dental caries; periodontal disease; occlusion; bite-force; infant; longitudinal study oral health; dental caries; periodontal disease; occlusion; bite-force; infant; longitudinal study
MDPI and ACS Style

Yamada, S.; Sakashita, R.; Ogura, M.; Nakanishi, E.; Sato, T. A Longitudinal Study on the Relationship of Oral Health at 4 Years of Age with That in Adulthood. Dent. J. 2021, 9, 17. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9020017

AMA Style

Yamada S, Sakashita R, Ogura M, Nakanishi E, Sato T. A Longitudinal Study on the Relationship of Oral Health at 4 Years of Age with That in Adulthood. Dentistry Journal. 2021; 9(2):17. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9020017

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yamada, Sho; Sakashita, Reiko; Ogura, Mikinori; Nakanishi, Eiko; Sato, Takuichi. 2021. "A Longitudinal Study on the Relationship of Oral Health at 4 Years of Age with That in Adulthood" Dent. J. 9, no. 2: 17. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9020017

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