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Article

Developing Person-Centred Dental Care: The Perspectives of People Living in Poverty

1
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montréal QC H3A 1G1, Canada
2
School of Public Health, Université de Montréal, Montréal QC H3N 1X9, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030082
Received: 18 June 2020 / Revised: 13 July 2020 / Accepted: 15 July 2020 / Published: 3 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Person-Centred Dentistry)
Dentistry has seen a slow trend toward person-centred care (PCC), with most approaches developed by scholars who have tried to progress away from disease-centred care. Unfortunately, the perspectives and experiences of underprivileged people have not been considered in the development of these approaches. Our objective was thus to understand underprivileged people’s experiences and expectations about dental care and contribute to the development of person-centred dentistry. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study with a sample of 13 people living in poverty. We used a maximum variation sampling strategy and selected them among the users of a free dental clinic in Montreal, Canada. We conducted semi-structured interviews that we audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed. Our main finding is that participants wanted to feel human and respected by dentists. More specifically, they wanted to be more involved in the dental care process through quality time and empathetic conversations with the dentist. They also wished for an exchange of information free of technical terms and built on mutual trust. In conclusion, person-centred dental care models should emphasize empathy, trust, and quality care beyond technical skills. Clinicians should provide comprehensive information in dental encounters and treat their patients as whole persons. View Full-Text
Keywords: person-centred dentistry; patient-centred care; biopsychosocial health; whole person care; qualitative methods; dental care person-centred dentistry; patient-centred care; biopsychosocial health; whole person care; qualitative methods; dental care
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MDPI and ACS Style

Noushi, N.; Bedos, C. Developing Person-Centred Dental Care: The Perspectives of People Living in Poverty. Dent. J. 2020, 8, 82. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030082

AMA Style

Noushi N, Bedos C. Developing Person-Centred Dental Care: The Perspectives of People Living in Poverty. Dentistry Journal. 2020; 8(3):82. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030082

Chicago/Turabian Style

Noushi, Nioushah; Bedos, Christophe. 2020. "Developing Person-Centred Dental Care: The Perspectives of People Living in Poverty" Dent. J. 8, no. 3: 82. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030082

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