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Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of Self-Help Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Children’s Dental Anxiety in General Dental Practice

1
Clapton Dental Surgery, London NW3 6BP, UK
2
Department of Psychology, Sociology and Politics, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK
3
School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020036
Received: 23 December 2018 / Revised: 7 March 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 1 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Impacts of Dental Conditions in Childhood)
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Abstract

Dental anxiety is very common; however, there is a lack of studies focusing on reducing children’s dental anxiety. One such initiative, the guided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) resources ‘Your teeth, you are in control’, reduces dental anxiety in children attending paediatric dentistry clinics. This service evaluation aims to investigate whether such CBT resources reduce children’s dental anxiety when implemented in general dental practice. A convenience sample of children was given the resources by their dental practitioner. There was no control group. Children completed the Children’s Experiences of Dental Anxiety Measure (CEDAM) prior to using the resources and on completion of a course of dental treatment. Overall, 84 children were involved, with a mean age of 10.9 years; 48 were female and 59 were living in the most deprived area of England. At baseline the mean CEDAM score was 20.3, and on receiving the resource and completing treatment the mean CEDAM score was 16.4, showing a significant reduction in dental anxiety (t = 14.6, (df = 83), p < 0.001, 95% CI: 3.4–4.4). The items that improved the most were worry over having dental treatment and dental treatment being painful. The service evaluation indicates a reduction in child dental anxiety following the use of CBT resources in general practice. Further evaluation, preferably a randomised controlled trial, is needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: dental anxiety; paediatric dentistry; cognitive behaviour therapy; behaviour management; primary care; service evaluation dental anxiety; paediatric dentistry; cognitive behaviour therapy; behaviour management; primary care; service evaluation
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Bux, S.; Porritt, J.; Marshman, Z. Evaluation of Self-Help Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Children’s Dental Anxiety in General Dental Practice. Dent. J. 2019, 7, 36.

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