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Article

Effects of Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Administration on Dental Sensitivity during In-Office and At-Home Interventions

1
Stomatologic Institute of Tuscany, Foundation of Clinic, Research and Post Graduate Program, 55041 Camaiore (Lucca), Italy
2
Laboratory of Vascular Biology and Angiogenesis, Scientific and Technological Pole, IRCCS MultiMedica, 20138 Milan, Italy
3
Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Dent. J. 2018, 6(4), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6040052
Received: 4 July 2018 / Revised: 12 September 2018 / Accepted: 17 September 2018 / Published: 1 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Hygiene and Epidemiology)
Background. Tooth bleaching is the most frequently employed whitening procedure in clinics. The major side effect of tooth bleaching is dental sensitivity during and after the treatment. Here, we evaluated whether the administration of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), during in-office and at-home procedures may impact on dental sensitivity. Methods. Eighty patients, responding to the study requirements were enrolled according to the following criteria. Group 1 (n = 40), received in-office, 10% ACP prior to 30% professional hydrogen peroxide application. The whitening procedure continued at home using 10% carbamide peroxide with 15% ACP for 15 days. Group 2 (n = 40) received only 30% hydrogen peroxide application and continued the whitening procedures at home, using 10% carbamide hydroxide, without ACP- Casein phosphopeptides (CPP), for 15 days. Dental sensitivity was recorded with a visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline, immediately after, and at 15 days after treatment in the two groups. Results. We observed that patients receiving ACP in the bleaching mixture experienced decreased dental sensitivity (* p ≤ 0.05), as detected by VAS scale analysis immediately following the procedures. Patients receiving ACP-CPP during at-home procedures showed a statistically significant (*** p ≤ 0.0001) reduction of dental sensitivity. Conclusions. We demonstrated that ACP-CPP administration, while exerting the same whitening effects as in control subjects receiving potassium fluoride (PF), had an impact on the reduction of dental sensitivity, improving patient compliance. View Full-Text
Keywords: dental sensitivity; tooth bleaching; amorphous calcium phosphate; in-office procedures; at-home procedures dental sensitivity; tooth bleaching; amorphous calcium phosphate; in-office procedures; at-home procedures
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oldoini, G.; Bruno, A.; Genovesi, A.M.; Parisi, L. Effects of Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Administration on Dental Sensitivity during In-Office and At-Home Interventions. Dent. J. 2018, 6, 52. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6040052

AMA Style

Oldoini G, Bruno A, Genovesi AM, Parisi L. Effects of Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Administration on Dental Sensitivity during In-Office and At-Home Interventions. Dentistry Journal. 2018; 6(4):52. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6040052

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oldoini, Giacomo, Antonino Bruno, Anna M. Genovesi, and Luca Parisi. 2018. "Effects of Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Administration on Dental Sensitivity during In-Office and At-Home Interventions" Dentistry Journal 6, no. 4: 52. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6040052

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