Next Article in Journal
The S3 State of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex: Overview of Spectroscopy and XFEL Crystallography with a Critical Evaluation of Early-Onset Models for O–O Bond Formation
Next Article in Special Issue
Copper Isotope Compositions of Superoxide Dismutase and Metallothionein from Post-Mortem Human Frontal Cortex
Previous Article in Journal
Pyridine-2,6-Dicarboxylic Acid Esters (pydicR2) as O,N,O-Pincer Ligands in CuII Complexes
Open AccessReview

Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrometry: Metal Imaging in Experimental and Clinical Wilson Disease

Institute of Molecular Pathobiochemistry, Experimental Gene Therapy and Clinical Chemistry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, D-52074 Aachen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Inorganics 2019, 7(4), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics7040054
Received: 12 March 2019 / Revised: 14 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 19 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metals in Neurodegenerative Diseases)
Wilson disease is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene resulting in copper metabolism disturbances. As a consequence, copper accumulates in different organs with most common presentation in liver and brain. Chelating agents that nonspecifically chelate copper, and promote its urinary excretion, or zinc salts interfering with the absorption of copper from the gastrointestinal tract, are current medications. Also gene therapy, restoring ATP7B gene function or trials with bis-choline tetrathiomolybdate (WTX101) removing excess copper from intracellular hepatic copper stores and increasing biliary copper excretion, is promising in reducing body’s copper content. Therapy efficacy is mostly evaluated by testing for evidence of liver disease and neurological symptoms, hepatic synthetic functions, indices of copper metabolisms, urinary copper excretions, or direct copper measurements. However, several studies conducted in patients or Wilson disease models have shown that not only the absolute concentration of copper, but also its spatial distribution within the diseased tissue is relevant for disease severity and outcome. Here we discuss laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry imaging as a novel method for accurate determination of trace element concentrations with high diagnostic sensitivity, spatial resolution, specificity, and quantification ability in experimental and clinical Wilson disease specimens. View Full-Text
Keywords: metal; imaging; genetic disease; ATP7B; copper; diagnostic; animal model; therapy; neuropsychiatric symptoms; liver disease metal; imaging; genetic disease; ATP7B; copper; diagnostic; animal model; therapy; neuropsychiatric symptoms; liver disease
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Weiskirchen, S.; Kim, P.; Weiskirchen, R. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrometry: Metal Imaging in Experimental and Clinical Wilson Disease. Inorganics 2019, 7, 54.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop