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Article

Maximizing the Antioxidant Capacity of Padina pavonica by Choosing the Right Drying and Extraction Methods

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Department of Marine Studies, University of Split, Ruđera Boškovića 37, 21000 Split, Croatia
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Department of Food Technology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, University of Split, Ruđera Boškovića 35, 21000 Split, Croatia
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Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy
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Department of Seafood Processing Technology, Faculty of Fisheries, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana, Turkey
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chang-Wei Hsieh
Processes 2021, 9(4), 587; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9040587
Received: 8 March 2021 / Revised: 17 March 2021 / Accepted: 24 March 2021 / Published: 27 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Activity Evaluation Process of Natural Antioxidants)
Marine algae are becoming an interesting source of biologically active compounds with a promising application as nutraceuticals, functional food ingredients, and therapeutic agents. The effect of drying (freeze-drying, oven-drying, and shade-drying) and extraction methods (shaking at room temperature, shaking in an incubator at 60 °C, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE), and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE)) on the total phenolics content (TPC), total flavonoids content (TFC), and total tannins content (TTC), as well as antioxidant capacity of the water/ethanol extracts from Padina pavonica were investigated. The TPC, TFC, and TTC values of P. pavonica were in the range from 0.44 ± 0.03 to 4.32 ± 0.15 gallic acid equivalents in mg/g (mg GAE/g) dry algae, from 0.31 ± 0.01 to 2.87 ± 0.01 mg QE/g dry algae, and from 0.32 ± 0.02 to 10.41 ± 0.62 mg CE/g dry algae, respectively. The highest TPC was found in the freeze-dried sample in 50% ethanol, extracted by MAE (200 W, 60 °C, and 5 min). In all cases, freeze-dried samples extracted with ethanol (both 50% and 70%) had the higher antioxidant activity, while MAE as a green option reduces the extraction time without the loss of antioxidant activity in P. pavonica. View Full-Text
Keywords: Padina pavonica; brown algae; ultrasound-assisted extraction; microwave-assisted extraction; antioxidant activity; green extraction; phenolic compounds Padina pavonica; brown algae; ultrasound-assisted extraction; microwave-assisted extraction; antioxidant activity; green extraction; phenolic compounds
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MDPI and ACS Style

Čagalj, M.; Skroza, D.; Tabanelli, G.; Özogul, F.; Šimat, V. Maximizing the Antioxidant Capacity of Padina pavonica by Choosing the Right Drying and Extraction Methods. Processes 2021, 9, 587. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9040587

AMA Style

Čagalj M, Skroza D, Tabanelli G, Özogul F, Šimat V. Maximizing the Antioxidant Capacity of Padina pavonica by Choosing the Right Drying and Extraction Methods. Processes. 2021; 9(4):587. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9040587

Chicago/Turabian Style

Čagalj, Martina, Danijela Skroza, Giulia Tabanelli, Fatih Özogul, and Vida Šimat. 2021. "Maximizing the Antioxidant Capacity of Padina pavonica by Choosing the Right Drying and Extraction Methods" Processes 9, no. 4: 587. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9040587

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