Next Article in Journal
Degradation of 2,4-Dichlorophenol by Ethylenediamine-N,N′-disuccinic Acid-Modified Photo-Fenton System: Effects of Chemical Compounds Present in Natural Waters
Next Article in Special Issue
Nitrogen Removal from Agricultural Subsurface Drainage by Surface-Flow Wetlands: Variability
Previous Article in Journal
Insights into Thermal Degradation Behaviors and Reaction Kinetics of Medical Waste Infusion Bag and Nasal Oxygen Cannula
Previous Article in Special Issue
Novel Study for Energy Recovery from the Cooling–Solidification Stage of Synthetic Slag Manufacturing: Estimation of the Potential Energy Recovery
Article

Adsorption of Tetracycline and Sulfadiazine onto Three Different Bioadsorbents in Binary Competitive Systems

1
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Engineering Polytechnic School, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo, Spain
2
Department of Plant Biology and Soil Science, Faculty of Sciences, Campus Ourense, Universidade de Vigo, 32004 Ourense, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Processes 2021, 9(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9010028
Received: 30 November 2020 / Revised: 21 December 2020 / Accepted: 22 December 2020 / Published: 24 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas, Water and Solid Waste Treatment Technology)
Different antibiotics contained in manure, slurry, wastewater or sewage sludge are spread into the environment. The harmful effects of these antibiotics could be minimized by means of immobilization onto bioadsorbent materials. This work investigates the competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline (TC) and sulfadiazine (SDZ) onto pine bark, oak ash and mussel shell. The study was carried out using batch-type experiments in binary systems (with both antibiotics present simultaneously), adding 5 equal concentrations of the antibiotics (between 1 and 50 µmol L−1). The adsorption percentages were higher for TC (close to 100% onto pine bark and oak ash, and between 40 and 85% onto mussel shell) than for SDZ (75–100% onto pine bark, and generally less than 10% on oak ash and mussel shell). Pine bark performed as the best adsorbent since TC adsorption remained close to 100% throughout the entire concentration range tested, while it was between 75 and 100% for SDZ. Desorption was always higher for SDZ than for TC. The results of this study could be useful to design practices to protected environmental compartments receiving discharges that simultaneously contain the two antibiotics here evaluated, and therefore could be relevant in terms of protection of the environment and public health. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibiotics; competitive sorption; retention/release; sorbents antibiotics; competitive sorption; retention/release; sorbents
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cela-Dablanca, R.; Conde-Cid, M.; Ferreira-Coelho, G.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Fernández-Calviño, D.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M.J.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E. Adsorption of Tetracycline and Sulfadiazine onto Three Different Bioadsorbents in Binary Competitive Systems. Processes 2021, 9, 28. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9010028

AMA Style

Cela-Dablanca R, Conde-Cid M, Ferreira-Coelho G, Arias-Estévez M, Fernández-Calviño D, Núñez-Delgado A, Fernández-Sanjurjo MJ, Álvarez-Rodríguez E. Adsorption of Tetracycline and Sulfadiazine onto Three Different Bioadsorbents in Binary Competitive Systems. Processes. 2021; 9(1):28. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9010028

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cela-Dablanca, Raquel, Manuel Conde-Cid, Gustavo Ferreira-Coelho, Manuel Arias-Estévez, David Fernández-Calviño, Avelino Núñez-Delgado, María J. Fernández-Sanjurjo, and Esperanza Álvarez-Rodríguez. 2021. "Adsorption of Tetracycline and Sulfadiazine onto Three Different Bioadsorbents in Binary Competitive Systems" Processes 9, no. 1: 28. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9010028

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop