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Article

Physical and Thermal Studies of Carbon-Enriched Silicon Oxycarbide Synthesized from Floating Plants

1
Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan
2
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia, Broga Road, Semenyih 43500, Malaysia
3
Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Centre for Biofuel and Biochemical Research, Institute of Self-Sustainable Building, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar 32610, Malaysia
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Green Energy Technology Research Centre and Department of Materials Engineering, Kun Shan University, Tainan 710, Taiwan
5
Queensland Alliance for Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Processes 2019, 7(11), 794; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7110794
Received: 6 September 2019 / Revised: 27 October 2019 / Accepted: 28 October 2019 / Published: 2 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Technologies: Bridging Conventional Practices and Industry 4.0)
In the present study, amorphous mesoporous silicon oxycarbide materials (SiOC) were successfully synthesized via a low-cost facile method by using potassium hydroxide activation, high temperature carbonization, and acid treatment. The precursors were obtained from floating plants (floating moss, water cabbage, and water caltrops). X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed the amorphous Si–O–C structure and Raman spectra revealed the graphitized carbon phase. Floating moss sample resulted in a rather rough surface with irregular patches and water caltrops sample resulted in a highly porous network structure. The rough surface of the floating moss sample with greater particle size is caused by the high carbon/oxygen ratio (1: 0.29) and low amount of hydroxyl group compared to the other two samples. The pore volumes of these floating moss, water cabbage, and water caltrops samples were 0.4, 0.49, and 0.63 cm3 g−1, respectively, resulting in thermal conductivities of 6.55, 2.46, and 1.14 Wm−1 K−1, respectively. Floating plants, or more specifically, floating moss, are thus a potential material for SiOC production. View Full-Text
Keywords: silicon oxycarbide; thermal conductivity; floating plants; SiOC; silica silicon oxycarbide; thermal conductivity; floating plants; SiOC; silica
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pan, G.-T.; Chong, S.; Chan, Y.J.; Tiong, T.J.; Lim, J.W.; Huang, C.-M.; Shukla, P.; Yang, T.C.-K. Physical and Thermal Studies of Carbon-Enriched Silicon Oxycarbide Synthesized from Floating Plants. Processes 2019, 7, 794. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7110794

AMA Style

Pan G-T, Chong S, Chan YJ, Tiong TJ, Lim JW, Huang C-M, Shukla P, Yang TC-K. Physical and Thermal Studies of Carbon-Enriched Silicon Oxycarbide Synthesized from Floating Plants. Processes. 2019; 7(11):794. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7110794

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pan, Guan-Ting, Siewhui Chong, Yi J. Chan, Timm J. Tiong, Jun W. Lim, Chao-Ming Huang, Pradeep Shukla, and Thomas C.-K. Yang. 2019. "Physical and Thermal Studies of Carbon-Enriched Silicon Oxycarbide Synthesized from Floating Plants" Processes 7, no. 11: 794. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7110794

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