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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Chromium VI and Fluoride Competitive Adsorption on Different Soils and By-Products

1
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Engineering Polytechnic School, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo, Spain
2
Department of Plant Biology and Soil Science, Faculty of Sciences, Campus Ourense, Universidade de Vigo, 32004 Ourense, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Processes 2019, 7(10), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7100748
Received: 24 September 2019 / Revised: 10 October 2019 / Accepted: 12 October 2019 / Published: 15 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas, Water and Solid Waste Treatment Technology)
Chromium (as Cr(VI)) and fluoride (F) are frequently found in effluents from different industrial activities. In cases where these effluents reach soil, it can play an important role in retaining those pollutants. Similarly, different byproducts could act as bio-adsorbents to directly treat polluted waters or to enhance the purging potential of soil. In this work, we used batch-type experiments to study competitive Cr(VI) and F adsorption in two different soils and several kinds of byproducts. Both soils, as well as mussel shell, oak ash, and hemp waste showed higher adsorption for F, while pyritic material, pine bark, and sawdust had a higher affinity for Cr(VI). Considering the binary competitive system, a clear competition between both elements in anionic form is shown, with decreases in adsorption of up to 90% for Cr(VI), and of up to 30% for F. Adsorption results showed better fitting to Freundlich’s than to Langmuir’s model. None of the individual soils or byproducts were able to adsorbing high percentages of both pollutants simultaneously, but it could be highly improved by adding pine bark to increase Cr(VI) adsorption in soils, thus drastically reducing the risks of pollution and deleterious effects on the environment and on public health. View Full-Text
Keywords: adsorption; chromium; competition; fluoride; soil and water pollution adsorption; chromium; competition; fluoride; soil and water pollution
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MDPI and ACS Style

Quintáns-Fondo, A.; Ferreira-Coelho, G.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J.C.; Fernández-Calviño, D.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M.J.; Núñez-Delgado, A. Chromium VI and Fluoride Competitive Adsorption on Different Soils and By-Products. Processes 2019, 7, 748. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7100748

AMA Style

Quintáns-Fondo A, Ferreira-Coelho G, Arias-Estévez M, Nóvoa-Muñoz JC, Fernández-Calviño D, Álvarez-Rodríguez E, Fernández-Sanjurjo MJ, Núñez-Delgado A. Chromium VI and Fluoride Competitive Adsorption on Different Soils and By-Products. Processes. 2019; 7(10):748. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7100748

Chicago/Turabian Style

Quintáns-Fondo, Ana; Ferreira-Coelho, Gustavo; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan C.; Fernández-Calviño, David; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María J.; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino. 2019. "Chromium VI and Fluoride Competitive Adsorption on Different Soils and By-Products" Processes 7, no. 10: 748. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7100748

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