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Rapid Separation of Elemental Species by Fast Multicapillary Gas Chromatography with Multichannel Optical Spectrometry Detection following Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction
Please note that, as of 1 January 2016, Chromatography has been renamed to Separations and is now published here.
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Studying Plant–Insect Interactions with Solid Phase Microextraction: Screening for Airborne Volatile Emissions Response of Soybeans to the Soybean Aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

by 1,2,†, Jacek A. Koziel 1,3,4,*,† and 5,†
1
Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
2
DuPont Crop Protection, Stine-Haskell Research Center, 1090 Elkton Road, Newark, Delaware, DE 19711, USA
3
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
4
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
5
Department of Entomology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Mary Boyce
Chromatography 2015, 2(2), 265-276; https://doi.org/10.3390/chromatography2020265
Received: 20 March 2015 / Accepted: 18 May 2015 / Published: 26 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid Phase Micro-Extraction)
Insects trigger plants to release volatile compounds that mediate the interaction with both pest and beneficial insects. Soybean aphids (Aphis glycines) induces soybean (Glycine max) leaves to produce volatiles that attract predators of the aphid. In this research, we describe the use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for extraction of volatiles from A. glycines-infested plant. Objectives were to (1) determine if SPME can be used to collect soybean plant volatiles and to (2) use headspace SPME-GC-MS approach to screen compounds associated with A. glycines-infested soybeans, grown in the laboratory and in the field, to identify previously known and potentially novel chemical markers of infestation. A total of 62 plant volatiles were identified, representing 10 chemical classes. 39 compounds had not been found in previous studies of soybean volatile emissions. 3-hexen-1-ol, dimethyl nonatriene, indole, caryophyllene, benzaldehyde, linalool, methyl salicylate (MeSA), benzene ethanol, and farnesene were considered herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs). For reproductive field-grown soybeans, three compounds were emitted in greater abundance from leaves infested with A. glycines, cis-3-hexen-1-ol acetate, MeSA and farnesene. In summary, SPME can detect the emission of HIPVs from plants infested with insect herbivores. View Full-Text
Keywords: herbivore-induced plant volatiles; SPME; GC-MS; Aphis glycines; soybeans; methyl salicylate (MeSA) herbivore-induced plant volatiles; SPME; GC-MS; Aphis glycines; soybeans; methyl salicylate (MeSA)
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Cai, L.; Koziel, J.A.; O'Neal, M.E. Studying Plant–Insect Interactions with Solid Phase Microextraction: Screening for Airborne Volatile Emissions Response of Soybeans to the Soybean Aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Chromatography 2015, 2, 265-276.

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