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Open AccessReview

Obesity in Children and Adolescents during COVID-19 Pandemic

1
2nd Department of Pediatrics, “P. & A. Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 115 27 Athens, Greece
2
Center for Adolescent Medicine and UNESCO Chair Adolescent Health Care, First Department of Pediatrics, “Agia Sophia” Children’s Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 115 27 Athens, Greece
3
Department of Clinical Therapeutics, “Alexandra” Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian, University of Athens, 115 28 Athens, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this manuscript.
Academic Editor: Kelly McQueen
Children 2021, 8(2), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8020135
Received: 30 December 2020 / Revised: 2 February 2021 / Accepted: 9 February 2021 / Published: 12 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Childhood and Adolescent Obesity and Weight Management)
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to special circumstances and changes to everyday life due to the worldwide measures that were imposed such as lockdowns. This review aims to evaluate obesity in children, adolescents and young adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A literature search was conducted to evaluate pertinent studies up to 10 November 2020. Results: A total of 15 articles were eligible; 9 identified 17,028,111 children, adolescents and young adults from 5–25 years old, 5 pertained to studies with an age admixture (n = 20,521) and one study included parents with children 5–18 years old (n = 584). During the COVID-19 era, children, adolescents and young adults gained weight. Changes in dietary behaviors, increased food intake and unhealthy food choices including potatoes, meat and sugary drinks were noted during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Food insecurity associated with financial reasons represents another concern. Moreover, as the restrictions imposed reduced movements out of the house, physical activity was limited, representing another risk factor for weight gain. Conclusions: COVID-19 restrictions disrupted the everyday routine of children, adolescents and young adults and elicited changes in their eating behaviors and physical activity. To protect them, health care providers should highlight the risk of obesity and provide prevention strategies, ensuring also parental participation. Worldwide policies, guidelines and precautionary measures should ideally be established. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; obesity; weight gain COVID-19; obesity; weight gain
MDPI and ACS Style

Stavridou, A.; Kapsali, E.; Panagouli, E.; Thirios, A.; Polychronis, K.; Bacopoulou, F.; Psaltopoulou, T.; Tsolia, M.; Sergentanis, T.N.; Tsitsika, A. Obesity in Children and Adolescents during COVID-19 Pandemic. Children 2021, 8, 135. https://doi.org/10.3390/children8020135

AMA Style

Stavridou A, Kapsali E, Panagouli E, Thirios A, Polychronis K, Bacopoulou F, Psaltopoulou T, Tsolia M, Sergentanis TN, Tsitsika A. Obesity in Children and Adolescents during COVID-19 Pandemic. Children. 2021; 8(2):135. https://doi.org/10.3390/children8020135

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stavridou, Androniki; Kapsali, Evangelia; Panagouli, Eleni; Thirios, Athanasios; Polychronis, Konstantinos; Bacopoulou, Flora; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Tsolia, Maria; Sergentanis, Theodoros N.; Tsitsika, Artemis. 2021. "Obesity in Children and Adolescents during COVID-19 Pandemic" Children 8, no. 2: 135. https://doi.org/10.3390/children8020135

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