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Article

Examining Factors of Accelerometer-Measured Sedentary Time in a Sample of Rural Canadian Children

by 1,2,3,*, 1,2,3, 1,2,3, 1,2,3 and 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
1
Human Environments Analysis Laboratory, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
2
Department of Geography and Environment, Western University, London, ON N6A 5C2, Canada
3
Children’s Health Research Institute, London, ON N6A 5A5, Canada
4
Department of Paediatrics, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
5
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Western University, London, ON N6A 5C1, Canada
6
School of Health Studies, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
7
Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON N6C 2R5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Children 2020, 7(11), 232; https://doi.org/10.3390/children7110232
Received: 11 October 2020 / Revised: 12 November 2020 / Accepted: 12 November 2020 / Published: 17 November 2020
The aim of this study was to examine potential child-level and day-level factors of accelerometer-measured sedentary time in a sample of rural Canadian children. Children (n = 86) from rural Northwestern Ontario participated in this study. Children’s sedentary times were identified and logged using an accelerometer. Child-level data (socio-demographic, household, and environment) came from surveys of children and their parents and a passively logging global positioning unit. Day-level data on day type (weekday/weekend) and weather (temperature, precipitation) were based on the dates of data collection and meteorological data came from the closest Environment Canada weather station. Cross-classified regression models were used to assess the relationship between child-level and day-level correlates of sedentary time. Boys were less sedentary than girls (b = −30.53 p = 0.01). For each one-year age increase, children’s sedentary time increased (b = 12.79 p < 0.01). This study indicates a difference in sedentary time based on a child’s age and gender. However, family, environmental, and weather characteristics did not influence sedentary time in this sample. Health practitioners who deliver care for northern rural youth can provide targeted health advice regarding sedentary time and consider gender and age to be risk factors for these behaviors. View Full-Text
Keywords: rural; child; sedentary time; Northern Ontario; weather rural; child; sedentary time; Northern Ontario; weather
MDPI and ACS Style

Button, B.L.G.; Martin, G.; Clark, A.F.; Graat, M.; Gilliland, J.A. Examining Factors of Accelerometer-Measured Sedentary Time in a Sample of Rural Canadian Children. Children 2020, 7, 232. https://doi.org/10.3390/children7110232

AMA Style

Button BLG, Martin G, Clark AF, Graat M, Gilliland JA. Examining Factors of Accelerometer-Measured Sedentary Time in a Sample of Rural Canadian Children. Children. 2020; 7(11):232. https://doi.org/10.3390/children7110232

Chicago/Turabian Style

Button, Brenton L.G., Gina Martin, Andrew F. Clark, Megan Graat, and Jason A. Gilliland. 2020. "Examining Factors of Accelerometer-Measured Sedentary Time in a Sample of Rural Canadian Children" Children 7, no. 11: 232. https://doi.org/10.3390/children7110232

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