Next Article in Journal
Changes in Parent Psychological Flexibility after a One-Time Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Parents of Adolescents with Persistent Pain Conditions
Previous Article in Journal
Genetic Predisposition to Neuroblastoma
Previous Article in Special Issue
Supporting Parent Caregivers of Children with Life-Limiting Illness
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessEditorial
Children 2018, 5(9), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5090120

Delivering Pediatric Palliative Care: From Denial, Palliphobia, Pallilalia to Palliactive

1
Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 2525 Chicago Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55403, USA
2
University of Minnesota Medical School, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
3
Department of Palliative Care and Rehabilitation Medicine, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 31 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Palliative Care)
Full-Text   |   PDF [236 KB, uploaded 31 August 2018]

Abstract

Among the over 21 million children with life-limiting conditions worldwide that would benefit annually from a pediatric palliative care (PPC) approach, more than eight million would need specialized PPC services. In the United States alone, more than 42,000 children die every year, half of them infants younger than one year. Advanced interdisciplinary pediatric palliative care for children with serious illnesses is now an expected standard of pediatric medicine. Unfortunately, in many institutions there remain significant barriers to achieving optimal care related to lack of formal education, reimbursement issues, the emotional impact of caring for a dying child, and most importantly, the lack of interdisciplinary PPC teams with sufficient staffing and funding. Data reveals the majority of distressing symptoms in children with serious illness (such as pain, dyspnea and nausea/vomiting) were not addressed during their end-of-life period, and when treated, therapy was commonly ineffective. Whenever possible, treatment should focus on continued efforts to control the underlying illness. At the same time, children and their families should have access to interdisciplinary care aimed at promoting optimal physical, psychological and spiritual wellbeing. Persistent myths and misconceptions have led to inadequate symptom control in children with life-limiting diseases. Pediatric Palliative Care advocates the provision of comfort care, pain, and symptom management concurrently with disease-directed treatments. Families no longer have to opt for one over the other. They can pursue both, and include integrative care to maximize the child’s quality of life. Since most of the sickest children with serious illness are being taken care of in a hospital, every children’s hospital is now expected to offer an interdisciplinary palliative care service as the standard of care. This article addresses common myths and misconceptions which may pose clinical obstacles to effective PPC delivery and discusses the four typical stages of pediatric palliative care program implementation. View Full-Text
Keywords: pediatric palliative care; program development; barriers; hospice; myths; program implementation pediatric palliative care; program development; barriers; hospice; myths; program implementation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Friedrichsdorf, S.J.; Bruera, E. Delivering Pediatric Palliative Care: From Denial, Palliphobia, Pallilalia to Palliactive. Children 2018, 5, 120.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Children EISSN 2227-9067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top