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Children 2018, 5(8), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5080101

Piloting a Developmental Screening Tool Adapted for East African Children

1
Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2
Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
3
Environmental Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
4
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
5
Paediatrics and Child Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
6
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Global Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 13 July 2018 / Accepted: 24 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Global and Public Health)
Full-Text   |   PDF [232 KB, uploaded 26 July 2018]

Abstract

There is a need for developmental screening that is easily administered in resource-poor settings. We hypothesized that known risk factors would predict failed developmental screening on an adapted screening tool in East African children living in poverty. The sample included 100 healthy Ugandan children aged 6–59 months. We adapted a parent-reported developmental screener based on the Child Development Review chart. The primary outcome was failure to meet age-appropriate milestones for any developmental domain. Venous blood was analyzed for lead, and caregivers completed a demographics questionnaire. We used multivariate logistic regression models to determine if elevated blood lead and stunting predicted failure on the screener, controlling for maternal education level, age in months past the lower bound of the child’s developmental age group, and absence of home electricity. In the sample, 14% (n = 14) of children failed one or more milestones on the screener. Lead levels or stunting did not predict failing the screener after controlling for covariates. Though this tool was feasibly administered, it did not demonstrate preliminary construct validity and is not yet recommended for screening in high-risk populations. Future research should include a larger sample size and cognitive interviews to ensure it is contextually relevant. View Full-Text
Keywords: development; milestones; screening; poverty; stunting; lead exposure; developmental risk; child health; global health; pediatrics development; milestones; screening; poverty; stunting; lead exposure; developmental risk; child health; global health; pediatrics
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Sajady, M.A.; Mehus, C.J.; Moody, E.C.; Jaramillo, E.G.; Mupere, E.; Barnes, A.J.; Cusick, S.E. Piloting a Developmental Screening Tool Adapted for East African Children. Children 2018, 5, 101.

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