Next Article in Journal
European Clinical Neuropsychology: Role in Healthcare and Access to Neuropsychological Services
Previous Article in Journal
Concerns, Knowledge, and Practices of Dentists in Mexico Regarding Infection Control during the Coronavirus Disease Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Potential Impact of Selected Bacterial Strains on the Stress Response
Article

Neuropsychiatric and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Lyme Disease: A Study of 252 Patients

Medical School Hamburg, University of Applied Sciences and Medical University, Am Kaiserkai 1, 20457 Hamburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Raphael B. Stricker and Francesco Saverio Bersani
Healthcare 2021, 9(6), 733; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9060733
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 9 June 2021 / Accepted: 10 June 2021 / Published: 14 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Somatopsychology: When Madness Arises from the Body)
This study examined the relationship between neuropsychiatric and psychological symptoms in patients with Lyme borreliosis. We collected data from an experimental group of 252 Lyme disease patients and a control group of 267 healthy individuals. The quality of life and sleep, attention and memory performance were assessed in both groups. Additionally, we investigated depressive symptoms in patients with Lyme disease to examine whether the duration of the disease had an influence on the severity of symptoms shown. Furthermore, various data on the diagnostics and treatment carried out in the patient group were recorded. On average, patients visited almost eight physicians to obtain a diagnosis, and eight years passed between the tick bite and diagnosis (SD ± 7.8); less than half of the sample (46%) received their diagnosis within the first five years after the development of symptoms. It became clear that Lyme disease is often diagnosed very late. It appears that people suffering from Lyme disease have significantly lower quality of life and sleep and show cognitive impairments when it comes to attention and memory. This study shows that 3.1% of Lyme patients were satisfied with their lives and that 37% scored in the lower third of the quality-of-life scale. It was also shown that Lyme patients tend to have depressive symptoms. View Full-Text
Keywords: borreliosis; Lyme disease; Borrelia burgdorferi borreliosis; Lyme disease; Borrelia burgdorferi
MDPI and ACS Style

Hündersen, F.; Forst, S.; Kasten, E. Neuropsychiatric and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Lyme Disease: A Study of 252 Patients. Healthcare 2021, 9, 733. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9060733

AMA Style

Hündersen F, Forst S, Kasten E. Neuropsychiatric and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Lyme Disease: A Study of 252 Patients. Healthcare. 2021; 9(6):733. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9060733

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hündersen, Finja, Stefanie Forst, and Erich Kasten. 2021. "Neuropsychiatric and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Lyme Disease: A Study of 252 Patients" Healthcare 9, no. 6: 733. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9060733

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop