Next Article in Journal
Intermittent Energy Restriction, Weight Loss and Cardiometabolic Risk: A Critical Appraisal of Evidence in Humans
Next Article in Special Issue
Neuropsychiatric and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Lyme Disease: A Study of 252 Patients
Previous Article in Journal
Current Status of Traditional Korean Medicine Services in Public Sector: A Study for Integrating Traditional Korean Medicine into Community Care System
Previous Article in Special Issue
Psychopathology and Somatic Complaints: A Cross-Sectional Study with Portuguese Adults
Review

The Potential Impact of Selected Bacterial Strains on the Stress Response

Department of Psychology, Faculty of Human Sciences, Medical School Hamburg, 20457 Hamburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, FernUniversität in Hagen, 58097 Hagen, Germany.
Academic Editor: Alyx Taylor
Healthcare 2021, 9(5), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050494
Received: 25 February 2021 / Revised: 15 April 2021 / Accepted: 16 April 2021 / Published: 22 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Somatopsychology: When Madness Arises from the Body)
Introduction: The composition of the microbiome is subject to a variety of factors, such as eating behavior and the history of medical treatment. The interest in the impact of the microbiome on the stress response is mainly explained by the lack of development of new effective treatments for stress-related diseases. This scoping review aims to present the current state of research regarding the impact of bacterial strains in the gut on the stress response in humans in order to not only highlight these impacts but to also suggest potential intervention options. Methods: We included full-text articles on studies that: (a) were consistent with our research question; and (b) included the variable stress either using biomedical parameters such as cortisol or by examining the subjective stress level. Information from selected studies was synthesized from study designs and the main findings. Results: Seven studies were included, although they were heterogenous. The results of these studies do not allow a general statement about the effects of the selected bacterial strains on the stress response of the subjects and their precise pathways of action. However, one of the works gives evidence that the consumption of probiotics leads to a decrease in blood pressure and others show that stress-induced symptoms (including abdominal pain and headache) in healthy subjects could be reduced. Conclusion: Due to different intake period and composition of the bacterial strains administered to the subjects, the studies presented here can only provide a limited meaningful judgement. As these studies included healthy participants between the ages of 18 and 60 years, a generalization to clinical populations is also not recommended. In order to confirm current effects and implement manipulation of the microbiome as a treatment method for clinical cases, future studies would benefit from examining the effects of the intestinal microbiome on the stress response in a clinical setting. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbiome; stress response; probiotics; mental health; stress-induced diseases microbiome; stress response; probiotics; mental health; stress-induced diseases
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Anker-Ladefoged, C.; Langkamp, T.; Mueller-Alcazar, A. The Potential Impact of Selected Bacterial Strains on the Stress Response. Healthcare 2021, 9, 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050494

AMA Style

Anker-Ladefoged C, Langkamp T, Mueller-Alcazar A. The Potential Impact of Selected Bacterial Strains on the Stress Response. Healthcare. 2021; 9(5):494. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050494

Chicago/Turabian Style

Anker-Ladefoged, Clara, Thomas Langkamp, and Anett Mueller-Alcazar. 2021. "The Potential Impact of Selected Bacterial Strains on the Stress Response" Healthcare 9, no. 5: 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050494

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop