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Caring for the Patient with Severe or Very Severe Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Case Report

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Diagnosing and Treatment Challenges and the Possibility of Jarisch–Herxheimer Reactions If High Infectious Loads Are Present

Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California, 1540 E. Alcazar St., CHP-155, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9006, USA
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Academic Editor: Roberto Nuño-Solinís
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1537; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111537
Received: 13 September 2021 / Revised: 29 October 2021 / Accepted: 9 November 2021 / Published: 10 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ME/CFS – the Severely and Very Severely Affected)
Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a complex multi-system disease with no cure and no FDA-approved treatment. Approximately 25% of patients are house or bedbound, and some are so severe in function that they require tube-feeding and are unable to tolerate light, sound, and human touch. The overall goal of this case report was to (1) describe how past events (e.g., chronic sinusitis, amenorrhea, tick bites, congenital neutropenia, psychogenic polydipsia, food intolerances, and hypothyroidism) may have contributed to the development of severe ME/CFS in a single patient, and (2) the extensive medical interventions that the patient has pursued in an attempt to recover, which enabled her to return to graduate school after becoming bedridden with ME/CFS 4.5 years prior. This paper aims to increase awareness of the harsh reality of ME/CFS and the potential complications following initiation of any level of intervention, some of which may be necessary for long-term healing. Treatments may induce severe paradoxical reactions (Jarisch–Herxheimer reaction) if high infectious loads are present. It is our hope that sharing this case will improve research and treatment options for ME/CFS. View Full-Text
Keywords: myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME); chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS); post-exertional malaise; die-off reactions; chronic illness; Lyme disease; Epstein–Barr virus; Mycoplasma pneumonia; candida; orthostatic intolerance; light therapy; eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR); emotional freedom technique (EFT) myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME); chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS); post-exertional malaise; die-off reactions; chronic illness; Lyme disease; Epstein–Barr virus; Mycoplasma pneumonia; candida; orthostatic intolerance; light therapy; eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR); emotional freedom technique (EFT)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Straub, R.K.; Powers, C.M. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Diagnosing and Treatment Challenges and the Possibility of Jarisch–Herxheimer Reactions If High Infectious Loads Are Present. Healthcare 2021, 9, 1537. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111537

AMA Style

Straub RK, Powers CM. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Diagnosing and Treatment Challenges and the Possibility of Jarisch–Herxheimer Reactions If High Infectious Loads Are Present. Healthcare. 2021; 9(11):1537. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111537

Chicago/Turabian Style

Straub, Rachel K., and Christopher M. Powers 2021. "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Diagnosing and Treatment Challenges and the Possibility of Jarisch–Herxheimer Reactions If High Infectious Loads Are Present" Healthcare 9, no. 11: 1537. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111537

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