Next Article in Journal
Epidemiology of Coronavirus COVID-19: Forecasting the Future Incidence in Different Countries
Next Article in Special Issue
Factors Affecting Mistreatment of the Elderly in Long-Term Care Facilities
Previous Article in Journal
Lyme Disease: Diversity of Borrelia Species in California and Mexico Detected Using a Novel Immunoblot Assay
Article

Workplace Violence among British Columbia Nurses Across Different Roles and Contexts

1
School of Nursing, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada
2
School of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020098
Received: 23 March 2020 / Revised: 9 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 14 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence Prevention and Management in the Healthcare Sector)
Workplace violence in healthcare settings is on the rise, particularly against nurses. Most healthcare violence research is in acute care settings. The purpose of this paper is to present descriptive findings on the prevalence of types and sources of workplace violence among nurses in different roles (i.e., direct care, leader, educator), specialties, care sectors (i.e., acute, community, long-term care) and geographic contexts (i.e., urban, suburban, rural) within the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. This is a province-wide survey study using a cross-sectional descriptive, correlational design. An electronic survey was emailed by the provincial union to members across the province in Fall 2019. A total of 4462 responses were analyzed using descriptive and chi-square statistics. The most common types of workplace violence were emotional abuse, threats of assault and physical assault for all nursing roles and contexts. Findings were similar to previous BC research from two decades ago except for two to ten times higher proportions of all types of violence, including verbal and physical sexual assault. Patients were the most common source of violence towards nurses. Nurses should be involved in developing workplace violence interventions that are tailored to work environment contexts and populations. View Full-Text
Keywords: workplace violence; types; sources; roles; sector; geographical region; specialty; nursing; patients; family; visitors workplace violence; types; sources; roles; sector; geographical region; specialty; nursing; patients; family; visitors
MDPI and ACS Style

Havaei, F.; MacPhee, M.; Ma, A. Workplace Violence among British Columbia Nurses Across Different Roles and Contexts. Healthcare 2020, 8, 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020098

AMA Style

Havaei F, MacPhee M, Ma A. Workplace Violence among British Columbia Nurses Across Different Roles and Contexts. Healthcare. 2020; 8(2):98. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020098

Chicago/Turabian Style

Havaei, Farinaz, Maura MacPhee, and Andy Ma. 2020. "Workplace Violence among British Columbia Nurses Across Different Roles and Contexts" Healthcare 8, no. 2: 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020098

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop