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Article

Increased Wellbeing following Engagement in a Group Nature-Based Programme: The Green Gym Programme Delivered by the Conservation Volunteers

1
School of Social Sciences, Psychology, University of Westminster, London W1W 6UW, UK
2
School of Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK
3
The Conservation Volunteers, Doncaster DN4 8DB, UK
4
Bedfordshire, Luton and Milton Keynes Integrated Care System, Luton LU1 2LJ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alyx Taylor
Healthcare 2022, 10(6), 978; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10060978
Received: 27 March 2022 / Revised: 5 May 2022 / Accepted: 12 May 2022 / Published: 25 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor and Nature Therapy)
The wellbeing benefits of engaging in a nature-based programme, delivered by the Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise sector, were examined in this study. Prior to attending The Conservation Volunteers’ Green Gym™, attendees (n = 892) completed demographics, health characteristics and the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Short-Form Scale. Attendees (n = 253, 28.4%) provided a measure on average 4.5 months later. There were significant increases in wellbeing after engaging in Green Gym, with the greatest increases in those who had the lowest starting levels of wellbeing. Wellbeing increases were sustained on average 8.5 months and 13 months later in those providing a follow up measure (n = 92, n = 40, respectively). Attendees who continued to engage in Green Gym but not provide follow up data (n = 318, 35.7%) tended to be more deprived, female and self-report a health condition. Attendees who did not continue to engage in Green Gym (n = 321, 36.0%) tended to be less deprived and younger. These findings provide evidence of the wellbeing benefits of community nature-based activities and social (‘green’) prescribing initiatives and indicate that Green Gym targets some groups most in need. View Full-Text
Keywords: nature-based activities; nature exposure; conservation; wellbeing; social prescribing nature-based activities; nature exposure; conservation; wellbeing; social prescribing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Smyth, N.; Thorn, L.; Wood, C.; Hall, D.; Lister, C. Increased Wellbeing following Engagement in a Group Nature-Based Programme: The Green Gym Programme Delivered by the Conservation Volunteers. Healthcare 2022, 10, 978. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10060978

AMA Style

Smyth N, Thorn L, Wood C, Hall D, Lister C. Increased Wellbeing following Engagement in a Group Nature-Based Programme: The Green Gym Programme Delivered by the Conservation Volunteers. Healthcare. 2022; 10(6):978. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10060978

Chicago/Turabian Style

Smyth, Nina, Lisa Thorn, Carly Wood, Dominic Hall, and Craig Lister. 2022. "Increased Wellbeing following Engagement in a Group Nature-Based Programme: The Green Gym Programme Delivered by the Conservation Volunteers" Healthcare 10, no. 6: 978. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10060978

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