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Article

Unpacking Systems of Privilege: The Opportunity of Critical Reflection in Outdoor Adventure Education

1
Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, College of Education, Weber State University, Ogden, UT 84408, USA
2
Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, School of Professional Studies, SUNY Cortland, Cortland, NY 13045, USA
3
Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, College of Health, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 318; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10110318
Received: 29 September 2020 / Revised: 30 October 2020 / Accepted: 3 November 2020 / Published: 4 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)
Outdoor adventure education has an extensive history of considering how its students should wrestle with privilege. Recent events have brought issues of privilege to the forefront, which raises the question of whether outdoor adventure education can play a role in learning to see and affect systems of privilege. This paper examines several elements of outdoor adventure education that make it an ideal environment for teaching about systems of privilege, and makes the argument that Jack Mezirow’s critical reflection, wherein people question the principles that underlie their ideas, should be a key element of outdoor adventure education curriculum in the 21st century. The authors’ perspectives are grounded in critical theory and the assumption that power dynamics need to be examined in order to be changed. By combining critical reflection with the unique characteristics of outdoor adventure education, outdoor adventure educators may be able to successfully teach participants to recognize and impact systems that operate around them. View Full-Text
Keywords: social justice; experiential learning; transformative learning; equity; pedagogy; whiteness; gender; critical theory social justice; experiential learning; transformative learning; equity; pedagogy; whiteness; gender; critical theory
MDPI and ACS Style

Meerts-Brandsma, L.; Lackey, N.Q.; Warner, R.P. Unpacking Systems of Privilege: The Opportunity of Critical Reflection in Outdoor Adventure Education. Educ. Sci. 2020, 10, 318. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10110318

AMA Style

Meerts-Brandsma L, Lackey NQ, Warner RP. Unpacking Systems of Privilege: The Opportunity of Critical Reflection in Outdoor Adventure Education. Education Sciences. 2020; 10(11):318. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10110318

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meerts-Brandsma, Lisa, N. Q. Lackey, and Robert P. Warner 2020. "Unpacking Systems of Privilege: The Opportunity of Critical Reflection in Outdoor Adventure Education" Education Sciences 10, no. 11: 318. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10110318

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