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Article

Bringing Out-of-School Learning into the Classroom: Self- versus Peer-Monitoring of Learning Behaviour

1
Department of Biology Education, University of Bayreuth, D-95447 Bayreuth, Germany
2
Department of Science Education, Otto-Friedrich-University of Bamberg, D-96047 Bamberg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10100284
Received: 7 September 2020 / Revised: 9 October 2020 / Accepted: 10 October 2020 / Published: 16 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cooperative/Collaborative Learning)
Based on classroom management fostering autonomy support and intrinsic motivation, this study examines effects of reciprocal peer-monitoring of learning behaviours on cognitive and affective outcomes. Within our study, 470 German secondary school students between 13 and 16 years of age participated in a multimodal hands- and minds-on exhibition focusing on renewable resources. Three groups were separated and monitored via a pre-post-follow up questionnaire: the first conducted peer-monitoring with the performance of specific roles to manage students’ learning behaviours, the second accomplished a self-monitoring strategy, while the third group did not visit the exhibition. In contrast to the latter control group, both treatment groups produced a high increase in short- and long-term knowledge achievement. The peer-monitored group scored higher in cognitive learning outcomes than the self-monitored group did. Interestingly, the perceived level of choice did not differ between both treatment groups, whereas peer-monitoring increased students’ perceived competence and simultaneously reduced the perceived level of anxiety and boredom. Peer-monitoring realised with the performance of specific roles seems to keep students “on task” without lowering indicators for students’ intrinsic motivation. Herewith, we are amongst the first to suggest peer-monitoring as a semi-formal learning approach to balance between teacher-controlled instruction and free-choice exploration. View Full-Text
Keywords: peer-regulation; self-regulation; peer monitoring; workbook guidance; mobile science centre; semi-formal learning; hands-on learning; intrinsic motivation; autonomy in group learning; classroom management peer-regulation; self-regulation; peer monitoring; workbook guidance; mobile science centre; semi-formal learning; hands-on learning; intrinsic motivation; autonomy in group learning; classroom management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Larsen, Y.C.; Groß, J.; Bogner, F.X. Bringing Out-of-School Learning into the Classroom: Self- versus Peer-Monitoring of Learning Behaviour. Educ. Sci. 2020, 10, 284. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10100284

AMA Style

Larsen YC, Groß J, Bogner FX. Bringing Out-of-School Learning into the Classroom: Self- versus Peer-Monitoring of Learning Behaviour. Education Sciences. 2020; 10(10):284. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10100284

Chicago/Turabian Style

Larsen, Yelva C., Jorge Groß, and Franz X. Bogner. 2020. "Bringing Out-of-School Learning into the Classroom: Self- versus Peer-Monitoring of Learning Behaviour" Education Sciences 10, no. 10: 284. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10100284

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