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Open AccessArticle

A Descriptive Quantitative Analysis on the Extent of Polypharmacy in Recipients of Ontario Primary Care Team Pharmacist-Led Medication Reviews

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Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 144 College St, Toronto, ON M5S 3M2, Canada
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Family First Health Centre, 4270 Innes Rd, Orléans, ON K4A 5E6, Canada
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North York Family Health Team, 707-240 Duncan Mill Road, Toronto, ON M3B 3S6, Canada
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Thames Valley Family Health Team, 6-1385 N Routledge Park, London, ON N6H 5N5, Canada
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Department of Family Medicine and Health Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, 100 Main St W, Hamilton, ON L8P 1H6, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2020, 8(3), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030110
Received: 30 May 2020 / Revised: 23 June 2020 / Accepted: 25 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polypharmacy)
Pharmacist-led medication reviews have been shown to improve medication management, reducing the adverse effects of polypharmacy among older adults. This paper quantitatively examines the medications, medication discrepancies and drug therapy problems of recipients in primary care. A convenience sample of 16 primary care team pharmacists in Ontario, Canada contributed data for patients with whom they conducted a medication review over a prior four-week period. Data were uploaded using electronic data capture forms and descriptive analyses were completed. Two hundred and thirty-seven patients (on average, 67.9 years old) were included in the study, taking an average of 9.2 prescription medications ( ± 4.7). Majority of these patients (83.5%) were categorized as polypharmacy patients taking at least five or more prescribed drugs per day. Just over half of the patients were classified as having a low level of medication complexity (52.3%). Pharmacists identified 2.1 medication discrepancies ( ± 3.9) and 3.6 drug therapy problems per patient ( ± 2.8). Half these patients had more than one medication discrepancy and almost every patient had a drug therapy problem identified. Medication reviews conducted by pharmacists in primary care teams minimized medication discrepancies and addressed drug therapy problems to improve medication management and reduce adverse events that may result from polypharmacy. View Full-Text
Keywords: polypharmacy; morbidity; potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs); primary care; pharmacists; medication reviews; drug therapy management polypharmacy; morbidity; potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs); primary care; pharmacists; medication reviews; drug therapy management
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Benny Gerard, N.; Mathers, A.; Laeer, C.; Lui, E.; Kontio, T.; Patel, P.; Dolovich, L. A Descriptive Quantitative Analysis on the Extent of Polypharmacy in Recipients of Ontario Primary Care Team Pharmacist-Led Medication Reviews. Pharmacy 2020, 8, 110.

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