Next Article in Journal
Tracking Australian Hajj Pilgrims’ Health Behavior before, during and after Hajj, and the Effective Use of Preventive Measures in Reducing Hajj-Related Illness: A Cohort Study
Previous Article in Journal
Exploring the Availability of Emergency Contraception in New Brunswick Pharmacies: A Mystery-Client Telephone Study
Open AccessArticle

“The Difference between Plan b and ella®? They’re Basically the Same Thing”: Results from a Mystery Client Study

1
Division of Narrative Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
2
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women’s Health, University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96826, USA
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724-5078, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2020, 8(2), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8020077
Received: 28 February 2020 / Revised: 30 March 2020 / Accepted: 20 April 2020 / Published: 1 May 2020
Pharmacy staff can serve an important role educating patients about emergency contraceptive pills (ECP), particularly ulipristal acetate (UPA), which requires a prescription. We conducted a secondary analysis of a previously completed mystery client study, assessing accuracy of information provided by pharmacy staffers to patients inquiring by telephone about filling a prescription for UPA. From the period December 2013 to July 2014, researchers used a mystery client methodology, contacting 198 retail pharmacies in Hawaiʻi. Researchers posed as patients or providers attempting to fill a prescription for UPA. During the course of the call, they asked about differences between UPA and levonorgestrel ECPs. Nearly half of all pharmacy staffers were unfamiliar with UPA. The majority of responses describing differences between the medications were incorrect or misleading, such as responses implying that UPA is an abortifacient. Lack of familiarity and incorrect information provided by pharmacy staffers may act as additional barriers in patient access to UPA. Health practitioners prescribing UPA should ensure patients receive evidence-based counseling at the time of prescription, while efforts should also be made to improve pharmacy staff familiarity with emergency contraceptive options. View Full-Text
Keywords: ulipristal acetate; emergency contraception; pharmacies; United States; Hawaiʻi ulipristal acetate; emergency contraception; pharmacies; United States; Hawaiʻi
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kaur, G.; Fontanilla, T.; Bullock, H.; Tschann, M. “The Difference between Plan b and ella®? They’re Basically the Same Thing”: Results from a Mystery Client Study. Pharmacy 2020, 8, 77.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop