Next Article in Journal
Introducing Augmented Reality Technology to Enhance Learning in Pharmacy Education: A Pilot Study
Next Article in Special Issue
The National Pharmaceutical Council: Endorsing the Construction of Imaginary Worlds in Health Technology Assessment
Previous Article in Journal
The Mbeya Antimicrobial Stewardship Team: Implementing Antimicrobial Stewardship at a Zonal-Level Hospital in Southern Tanzania
Previous Article in Special Issue
“Stigma and HIV Are Like Brother and Sister!”: The Experience of African-Born Persons Living with HIV in the US
Open AccessArticle

The Significance of Taking Antiretroviral Medications for African-Born People Living with HIV and Residing in Minnesota

1
College of Pharmacy, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 301 S Perimeter Park Drive, Suite 220, Nashville, TN 37211, USA
2
Allina Health Uptown Clinic, 1221 West Lake St., Suite 201, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
3
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
4
School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
5
College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, 232 Life Science Duluth, 111 Kirby Drive, MN 55812, USA
6
College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2020, 8(2), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8020108
Received: 5 May 2020 / Revised: 23 June 2020 / Accepted: 25 June 2020 / Published: 26 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medication Experiences)
Thanks to the development of antiretroviral (ART) medications, HIV is now a chronic and manageable disease. This study aimed to (1) capture the experiences of African-born persons living with HIV and taking antiretroviral treatment, and (2) explore the impact of social and cultural factors on their decisions to follow the prescribed treatment. For this study, a qualitative approach was used. The participants were recruited via fliers, then screened for inclusion and exclusion criteria. Recruitment of the participants continued until data saturation occurred. The interview guide was developed based on the extensive literature and recommendations from the clinical team. In-person narrative interviews were conducted with 14 participants—African-born persons living with HIV and residing in Minnesota. Thematic Analysis revealed three emergent themes: “To exist I have to take the medicine”; barriers and facilitators in taking ART medications; and the power of spirituality and prayers. The findings of this study paint a picture of African-born persons living with HIV, and their experiences with ART medications. This study not only presents the participants’ medication experiences and their significance, but also tells their stories of how God and prayers play a significant role in helping them to get through the difficult moments of their lives. View Full-Text
Keywords: HIV/AIDS; medication experiences; African-born persons living with HIV HIV/AIDS; medication experiences; African-born persons living with HIV
MDPI and ACS Style

Cernasev, A.; Larson, W.L.; Peden-McAlpine, C.; Rockwood, T.; Ranelli, P.L.; Okoro, O.; Schommer, J.C. The Significance of Taking Antiretroviral Medications for African-Born People Living with HIV and Residing in Minnesota. Pharmacy 2020, 8, 108.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop