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Article

Adherence to Oral Anticancer Medications: Evolving Interprofessional Roles and Pharmacist Workforce Considerations

1
Naval Medical Center San Diego, United States Navy, San Diego, CA 92101, USA
2
Department of Biomedical and Health Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
3
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Ambulatory Pharmacy Services, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
4
Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
5
Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2018, 6(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6010023
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 6 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Labor Market for Pharmacists)
Interprofessional care is exhibited in outpatient oncology practices where practitioners from a myriad of specialties (e.g., oncology, nursing, pharmacy, health informatics and others) work collectively with patients to enhance therapeutic outcomes and minimize adverse effects. Historically, most ambulatory-based anticancer medication therapies have been administrated in infusion clinics or physician offices. Oral anticancer medications (OAMs) have become increasingly prevalent and preferred by patients for use in residential or other non-clinic settings. Self-administration of OAMs represents a significant shift in the management of cancer care and role responsibilities for patients and clinicians. While patients have a greater sense of empowerment and convenience when taking OAMs, adherence is a greater challenge than with intravenous therapies. This paper proposes use of a qualitative systems evaluation, based on theoretical frameworks for interdisciplinary team collaboration and systems science, to examine the social interactionism involved with the use of intravenous anticancer treatments and OAMs (as treatment technologies) by describing patient, organizational, and social systems considerations in communication, care, control, and context (i.e., Kaplan’s 4Cs). This conceptualization can help the healthcare system prepare for substantial workforce changes in cancer management, including increased utilization of oncology pharmacists. View Full-Text
Keywords: communication; team effectiveness; medication adherence; oncology workforce; oncology pharmacist; applied theory; systems science communication; team effectiveness; medication adherence; oncology workforce; oncology pharmacist; applied theory; systems science
MDPI and ACS Style

Paolella, G.A.; Boyd, A.D.; Wirth, S.M.; Cuellar, S.; Venepalli, N.K.; Crawford, S.Y. Adherence to Oral Anticancer Medications: Evolving Interprofessional Roles and Pharmacist Workforce Considerations. Pharmacy 2018, 6, 23. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6010023

AMA Style

Paolella GA, Boyd AD, Wirth SM, Cuellar S, Venepalli NK, Crawford SY. Adherence to Oral Anticancer Medications: Evolving Interprofessional Roles and Pharmacist Workforce Considerations. Pharmacy. 2018; 6(1):23. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6010023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Paolella, Gennaro A., Andrew D. Boyd, Scott M. Wirth, Sandra Cuellar, Neeta K. Venepalli, and Stephanie Y. Crawford 2018. "Adherence to Oral Anticancer Medications: Evolving Interprofessional Roles and Pharmacist Workforce Considerations" Pharmacy 6, no. 1: 23. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6010023

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