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Developing Oral Comprehension Skills with Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education

1
Département de Langues, Linguistique et Traduction, Université Laval, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Département de Didactique des Langues, Université du Québec à Montréal, QC H3C 3P8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Languages 2019, 4(3), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4030075
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 8 July 2019 / Accepted: 10 September 2019 / Published: 14 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immigrant and Refugee Languages)
The development of oral comprehension skills is rarely studied in second and foreign language teaching, let alone in learning contexts involving students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE). Thus, we conducted a mixed-methods study attempting to measure the effect of implicit teaching of oral comprehension strategies with 37 SLIFE in Quebec City, a predominantly French-speaking city in Canada. Two experimental groups received implicit training in listening strategies, whereas a control group viewed the same documents without strategy training. Participants’ listening comprehension performance was measured quantitatively before the treatment, immediately after, and one week later with three different versions of an oral comprehension test targeting both explicit and implicit content of authentic audiovisual documents. Overall, data analysis showed a low success rate for all participants in the oral comprehension tests, with no significant effect of the experimental treatment. However, data from the intervention sessions revealed that the participants’ verbalisations of their comprehension varied qualitatively over time. The combination of these results is discussed in light of previous findings on low literate adults’ informal and formal language learning experiences. View Full-Text
Keywords: students with limited or interrupted formal schooling; oral comprehension; strategy training students with limited or interrupted formal schooling; oral comprehension; strategy training
MDPI and ACS Style

Laberge, C.; Beaulieu, S.; Fortier, V. Developing Oral Comprehension Skills with Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education. Languages 2019, 4, 75.

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