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The Politics of Maladaptation
Article

Climate Change in the 2019 Canadian Federal Election

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Department of Sociology, MacEwan University, Edmonton, AB T5J 4S2, Canada
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Department of Psychology, MacEwan University, Edmonton, AB T5J 4S2, Canada
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Department of Political Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H4, Canada
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Department of Communication, School of Communication, Leadership, and Marketing, Kristiania University College, 0153 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Thomas Beery
Climate 2021, 9(5), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9050070
Received: 7 April 2021 / Revised: 20 April 2021 / Accepted: 21 April 2021 / Published: 24 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthropogenic Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives)
In the weeks before the 2019 federal election, climate change strikes occurred in Canada and across the globe, which may have increased the salience of this policy issue. We use two data sources to examine the role of climate change in the 2019 federal election: a representative survey of 1500 Canadians and 2109 Facebook posts from the five major party leaders. After accounting for political ideology and region, we find that concern about climate change was a strong positive predictor of liberal support. We triangulate these findings by analyzing Facebook posts. We find that left-wing politicians were more likely to post about climate change and that posts about climate change received more likes, comments, and shares than other posts. This higher level of user engagement did not differ depending on which political party posted the climate change message. The combination of sources offers news insights into citizen-elite interactions and electoral outcomes. Climate change was important in the election, whether this importance was measured through survey data or user engagement with leaders’ climate change posts. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; election; political ideology; candidates; partisanship; digital trace data; survey data climate change; election; political ideology; candidates; partisanship; digital trace data; survey data
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MDPI and ACS Style

Boulianne, S.; Belland, S.; Sleptcov, N.; Larsson, A.O. Climate Change in the 2019 Canadian Federal Election. Climate 2021, 9, 70. https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9050070

AMA Style

Boulianne S, Belland S, Sleptcov N, Larsson AO. Climate Change in the 2019 Canadian Federal Election. Climate. 2021; 9(5):70. https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9050070

Chicago/Turabian Style

Boulianne, Shelley, Stephanie Belland, Nikita Sleptcov, and Anders O. Larsson 2021. "Climate Change in the 2019 Canadian Federal Election" Climate 9, no. 5: 70. https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9050070

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