Next Article in Journal
Trend Analysis of Air Temperature in the Federal District of Brazil: 1980–2010
Previous Article in Journal
Investigating the Role of Extreme Synoptic Patterns and Complex Topography During Two Heavy Rainfall Events in Crete in February 2019
Open AccessArticle

A Methodology for the Assessment of Climate Change Adaptation Options for Cultural Heritage Sites

1
Department of Archaeology and Natural History, Australian National University, Canberra 2601, Australia
2
Djelk Rangers, Maningrida 0822, Australia
3
Kakadu National Park Rangers, Jabiru 0886, Australia
4
Fenner School of Environment & Society, Australian National University, Canberra 2601, Australia
5
Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, School of Engineering and Natural Sciences, University of Iceland, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
6
School of History and Heritage, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7WA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Climate 2020, 8(8), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli8080088
Received: 12 June 2020 / Revised: 22 July 2020 / Accepted: 23 July 2020 / Published: 24 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Climate Policy and Adaptation)
Cultural sites are particularly important to Indigenous peoples, their identity, cosmology and sociopolitical traditions. The benefits of local control, and a lack of professional resources, necessitate the development of planning tools that support independent Indigenous cultural site adaptation. We devised and tested a methodology for non-heritage professionals to analyse options that address site loss, build site resilience and build local adaptive capacity. Indigenous rangers from Kakadu National Park and the Djelk Indigenous Protected Area, Arnhem Land, Australia, were engaged as fellow researchers via a participatory action research methodology. Rangers rejected coastal defences and relocating sites, instead prioritising routine use of a risk field survey, documentation of vulnerable sites using new digital technologies and widely communicating the climate change vulnerability of sites via a video documentary. Results support the view that rigorous approaches to cultural site adaptation can be employed independently by local Indigenous stakeholders. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change adaptation; archaeology; cultural heritage; Indigenous; options analysis climate change adaptation; archaeology; cultural heritage; Indigenous; options analysis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Carmichael, B.; Wilson, G.; Namarnyilk, I.; Nadji, S.; Cahill, J.; Brockwell, S.; Webb, B.; Bird, D.; Daly, C. A Methodology for the Assessment of Climate Change Adaptation Options for Cultural Heritage Sites. Climate 2020, 8, 88.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop