Next Article in Journal
Projected Changes in the Frequency of Peak Flows along the Athabasca River: Sensitivity of Results to Statistical Methods of Analysis
Next Article in Special Issue
Precipitation Trends over the Indus Basin
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluation of Infilling Methods for Time Series of Daily Temperature Data: Case Study of Limpopo Province, South Africa
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Investigation into the Spatial and Temporal Variability of the Meteorological Drought in Jordan
Open AccessArticle

An Unusual Cold February 2019 in Saskatchewan—A Case Study Using NCEP Reanalysis Datasets

by Soumik Basu 1,2,* and David Sauchyn 1,2
1
Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative, Regina S4S 0A2, Canada
2
Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Climate 2019, 7(7), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7070087
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 28 June 2019 / Accepted: 1 July 2019 / Published: 3 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Local to Global Precipitation Dynamics and Climate Interaction)
In February 2019, central Canada, and especially the province of Saskatchewan, experienced extreme cold weather. It was the coldest February in 82 years and the second coldest in 115 years. In this study, we examine National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Reanalysis 1 data to understand the atmospheric processes leading to this cold snap. A detailed investigation of surface air temperature, sea level pressure, surface fluxes, and winds revealed a linkage between the North Pacific storm track and the February cold snap. A shift in the jet stream pattern triggered by the storm activity over the North Pacific caused a high-pressure blocking pattern, which resulted in unusual cold temperatures in Saskatchewan in February. This study demonstrates the potential for extreme cold in a warming climate; weather records in Saskatchewan show an increase in minimum winter temperature by 4–5 °C. View Full-Text
Keywords: extreme cold event; North Pacific storm track; jet stream; high-pressure blocking; Bering Sea ice extreme cold event; North Pacific storm track; jet stream; high-pressure blocking; Bering Sea ice
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Basu, S.; Sauchyn, D. An Unusual Cold February 2019 in Saskatchewan—A Case Study Using NCEP Reanalysis Datasets. Climate 2019, 7, 87.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop