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Climate 2019, 7(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7030039

Green Infrastructure Financing as an Imperative to Achieve Green Goals

1
Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York University, 295 Lafayette Street—2nd floor, New York, NY 10012, USA
2
Master of Science in Public Policy, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA
3
Master of Public Administration, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 January 2019 / Revised: 2 March 2019 / Accepted: 3 March 2019 / Published: 9 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Resilience and Urban Sustainability)
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Abstract

Green infrastructure (GI) has increasingly gained popularity for achieving adaptation and mitigation goals associated with climate change and extreme weather events. To continue implementing GI, financial tools are needed for upfront project capital or development costs and later for maintenance. This study’s purpose is to evaluate financing tools used in a selected GI dataset and to assess how those tools are linked to various GI technologies and other GI project characteristics like cost and size. The dataset includes over 400 GI U.S. projects, comprising a convenience sample, from the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). GI project characteristics were organized to answer a number of research questions using descriptive statistics. Results indicated that the number of projects and overall cost shares were mostly located in a few states. Grants were the most common financial tool with about two-thirds of the projects reporting information on financial tools receiving grant funding. Most projects reported financing from only one tool with a maximum of three tools. Projects primarily included multiple GI technologies averaging three and a maximum of nine. The most common GI technologies were bioswales, retention, rain gardens, and porous pavements. These findings are useful for decision-makers evaluating funding support for GI. View Full-Text
Keywords: green infrastructure finance; green infrastructure project costs; financial sources; public finance; private finance; stormwater management; climate mitigation and adaptation; co-benefits green infrastructure finance; green infrastructure project costs; financial sources; public finance; private finance; stormwater management; climate mitigation and adaptation; co-benefits
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Zimmerman, R.; Brenner, R.; Llopis Abella, J. Green Infrastructure Financing as an Imperative to Achieve Green Goals. Climate 2019, 7, 39.

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