Next Article in Journal
Effect of Shading on Red Colour and Fruit Quality in Blush Pears “ANP-0118” and “ANP-0131”
Next Article in Special Issue
Potential Role of Lolium multiflorum Lam. in the Management of Rice Weeds
Previous Article in Journal
Cytokinins Are Abundant and Widespread among Insect Species
Previous Article in Special Issue
Additive Effect of Botanical Insecticide and Entomopathogenic Fungi on Pest Mortality and the Behavioral Response of Its Natural Enemy
Open AccessReview

Opportunities and Scope for Botanical Extracts and Products for the Management of Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) for Smallholders in Africa

1
School of Agriculture and Biotechnology, University of Kabianga, Kericho P.O. Box 2030-20200, Kenya
2
Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK
3
Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3AB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(2), 207; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020207
Received: 16 January 2020 / Revised: 31 January 2020 / Accepted: 2 February 2020 / Published: 6 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pesticidal Plants: From Smallholder Use to Commercialisation)
Fall Armyworm (FAW) (Spodoptera frugiperda) is a polyphagous and highly destructive pest of many crops. It was recently introduced into Africa and now represents a serious threat to food security, particularly because of yield losses in maize, which is the staple food for the majority of small-scale farmers in Africa. The pest has also led to increased production costs, and threatens trade because of quarantines imposed on produce from the affected countries. There is limited specific knowledge on its management among smallholders since it is such a new pest in Africa. Some synthetic insecticides have been shown to be effective in controlling FAW, but in addition to the economic, health and environmental challenges of pesticide use insecticide resistance is highly prevalent owing to years of FAW management in the Americas. Therefore, there is a need for the development and use of alternatives for the management of FAW. These include plant-derived pesticides. Here we review the efficacy and potential of 69 plant species, which have been evaluated against FAW, and identify opportunities for use among small-scale maize farmers with a focus on how pesticidal plants might be adopted in Africa for management of FAW. The biological activities were diverse and included insecticidal, insectistatic (causing increased larval duration), larvicidal, reduced growth and acute toxicity (resulting in adverse effects within a short time after exposure). While most of these studies have been conducted on American plant taxa many South American plants are now cosmopolitan weeds so these studies are relevant to the African context. View Full-Text
Keywords: biopesticides; botanicals; corn; insects; pests; prospects biopesticides; botanicals; corn; insects; pests; prospects
MDPI and ACS Style

Rioba, N.B.; Stevenson, P.C. Opportunities and Scope for Botanical Extracts and Products for the Management of Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) for Smallholders in Africa. Plants 2020, 9, 207. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020207

AMA Style

Rioba NB, Stevenson PC. Opportunities and Scope for Botanical Extracts and Products for the Management of Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) for Smallholders in Africa. Plants. 2020; 9(2):207. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020207

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rioba, Naomi B.; Stevenson, Philip C. 2020. "Opportunities and Scope for Botanical Extracts and Products for the Management of Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) for Smallholders in Africa" Plants 9, no. 2: 207. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020207

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop