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Article

Canavanine Increases the Content of Phenolic Compounds in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Roots

1
Department of Plant Physiology, Institute of Biology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Botany, Institute of Biology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(11), 1595; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9111595
Received: 2 November 2020 / Revised: 13 November 2020 / Accepted: 14 November 2020 / Published: 17 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mode of Action of Plant Natural Products)
Canavanine (CAN) is a nonproteinogenic amino acid, and its toxicity comes from its utilization instead of arginine in many cellular processes. As presented in previous experiments, supplementation of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) with CAN led to decreased nitric oxide (NO) level and induced secondary oxidative stress. CAN improved total antioxidant capacity in roots, with parallel inhibition of enzymatic antioxidants. The aim of this work was to determine how CAN-dependent limitation of NO emission and reactive oxygen species overproduction impact content, localization, and metabolism of phenolic compounds (PCs) in tomato roots. Tomato seedlings were fed with CAN (10 and 50 µM) for 24 or 72 h. Inhibition of root growth due to CAN supplementation correlated with increased concentration of total PCs; CAN (50 µM) led to the homogeneous accumulation of PCs all over the roots. CAN increased also flavonoids content in root tips. The activity of polyphenol oxidases and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase increased only after prolonged treatment with 50 µM CAN, while expressions of genes encoding these enzymes were modified variously, irrespectively of CAN dosage and duration of the culture. PCs act as the important elements of the cellular antioxidant system under oxidative stress induced by CAN. View Full-Text
Keywords: canavanine; phenolic compounds; oxidative stress; nitric oxide; PAL; phenolic oxidase canavanine; phenolic compounds; oxidative stress; nitric oxide; PAL; phenolic oxidase
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MDPI and ACS Style

Staszek, P.; Krasuska, U.; Bederska-Błaszczyk, M.; Gniazdowska, A. Canavanine Increases the Content of Phenolic Compounds in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Roots. Plants 2020, 9, 1595. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9111595

AMA Style

Staszek P, Krasuska U, Bederska-Błaszczyk M, Gniazdowska A. Canavanine Increases the Content of Phenolic Compounds in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Roots. Plants. 2020; 9(11):1595. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9111595

Chicago/Turabian Style

Staszek, Pawel, Urszula Krasuska, Magdalena Bederska-Błaszczyk, and Agnieszka Gniazdowska. 2020. "Canavanine Increases the Content of Phenolic Compounds in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Roots" Plants 9, no. 11: 1595. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9111595

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