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Review

Understanding Host–Pathogen Interactions in Brassica napus in the Omics Era

1
Sunway College Kuala Lumpur, Bandar Sunway 47500, Selangor, Malaysia
2
School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Agriculture, The University of Western Australia, Perth 6009, Australia
3
School of Agriculture and Environment and Institute of Agriculture, The University of Western Australia, Perth 6009, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(10), 1336; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101336
Received: 16 September 2020 / Revised: 2 October 2020 / Accepted: 6 October 2020 / Published: 10 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omics in Plant-Pathogen Interaction)
Brassica napus (canola/oilseed rape/rapeseed) is an economically important crop, mostly found in temperate and sub-tropical regions, that is cultivated widely for its edible oil. Major diseases of Brassica crops such as Blackleg, Clubroot, Sclerotinia Stem Rot, Downy Mildew, Alternaria Leaf Spot and White Rust have caused significant yield and economic losses in rapeseed-producing countries worldwide, exacerbated by global climate change, and, if not remedied effectively, will threaten global food security. To gain further insights into the host–pathogen interactions in relation to Brassica diseases, it is critical that we review current knowledge in this area and discuss how omics technologies can offer promising results and help to push boundaries in our understanding of the resistance mechanisms. Omics technologies, such as genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics approaches, allow us to understand the host and pathogen, as well as the interaction between the two species at a deeper level. With these integrated data in multi-omics and systems biology, we are able to breed high-quality disease-resistant Brassica crops in a more holistic, targeted and accurate way. View Full-Text
Keywords: Brassica napus; host–pathogen interaction; pathosystems; omics; next-generation sequencing (NGS); pangenomics; secretomics; bioinformatics Brassica napus; host–pathogen interaction; pathosystems; omics; next-generation sequencing (NGS); pangenomics; secretomics; bioinformatics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Neik, T.X.; Amas, J.; Barbetti, M.; Edwards, D.; Batley, J. Understanding Host–Pathogen Interactions in Brassica napus in the Omics Era. Plants 2020, 9, 1336. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101336

AMA Style

Neik TX, Amas J, Barbetti M, Edwards D, Batley J. Understanding Host–Pathogen Interactions in Brassica napus in the Omics Era. Plants. 2020; 9(10):1336. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101336

Chicago/Turabian Style

Neik, Ting X., Junrey Amas, Martin Barbetti, David Edwards, and Jacqueline Batley. 2020. "Understanding Host–Pathogen Interactions in Brassica napus in the Omics Era" Plants 9, no. 10: 1336. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101336

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