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Identification of Candidate Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening and Crispness Retention Through Transcriptome Analyses of a ‘Honeycrisp’ Population

Department of Horticultural Science, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA
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Plants 2020, 9(10), 1335; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101335
Received: 12 August 2020 / Revised: 23 September 2020 / Accepted: 2 October 2020 / Published: 10 October 2020
Crispness retention is a postharvest trait that fruit of the ’Honeycrisp’ apple and some of its progeny possess. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of crispness retention, progeny individuals derived from a ’Honeycrisp’ × MN1764 population with fruit that either retain crispness (named “Retain”), lose crispness (named “Lose”), or that are not crisp at harvest (named “Non-crisp”) were selected for transcriptomic comparisons. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using RNA-Seq, and the expression levels of the DEGs were validated using nCounter®. Functional annotation of the DEGs revealed distinct ripening behaviors between fruit of the “Retain” and “Non-crisp” individuals, characterized by opposing expression patterns of auxin- and ethylene-related genes. However, both types of genes were highly expressed in the fruit of “Lose” individuals and ’Honeycrisp’, which led to the potential involvements of genes encoding auxin-conjugating enzyme (GH3), ubiquitin ligase (ETO), and jasmonate O-methyltransferase (JMT) in regulating fruit ripening. Cell wall-related genes also differentiated the phenotypic groups; greater numbers of cell wall synthesis genes were highly expressed in fruit of the “Retain” individuals and ’Honeycrisp’ when compared with “Non-crisp” individuals and MN1764. On the other hand, the phenotypic differences between fruit of the “Retain” and “Lose” individuals could be attributed to the functioning of fewer cell wall-modifying genes. A cell wall-modifying gene, MdXTH, was consistently identified as differentially expressed in those fruit over two years in this study, so is a major candidate for crispness retention. View Full-Text
Keywords: fruit ripening; cell wall; xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (MdXTH); RNA-Seq; nCounter® fruit ripening; cell wall; xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (MdXTH); RNA-Seq; nCounter®
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chang, H.-Y.; Tong, C.B.S. Identification of Candidate Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening and Crispness Retention Through Transcriptome Analyses of a ‘Honeycrisp’ Population. Plants 2020, 9, 1335. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101335

AMA Style

Chang H-Y, Tong CBS. Identification of Candidate Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening and Crispness Retention Through Transcriptome Analyses of a ‘Honeycrisp’ Population. Plants. 2020; 9(10):1335. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101335

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chang, Hsueh-Yuan, and Cindy B.S. Tong 2020. "Identification of Candidate Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening and Crispness Retention Through Transcriptome Analyses of a ‘Honeycrisp’ Population" Plants 9, no. 10: 1335. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101335

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