Next Article in Journal
Functional Diversity and Invasive Species Influence Soil Fertility in Experimental Grasslands
Next Article in Special Issue
Symbionts as Filters of Plant Colonization of Islands: Tests of Expected Patterns and Environmental Consequences in the Galapagos
Previous Article in Journal
The Complete Chloroplast Genomes of Two Lespedeza Species: Insights into Codon Usage Bias, RNA Editing Sites, and Phylogenetic Relationships in Desmodieae (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effect of Indigenous and Introduced Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth and Phytochemical Content of Vegetatively Propagated Prunus africana (Hook. f.) Kalkman Provenances
Open AccessArticle

Changes in an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Community Along an Environmental Gradient

1
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia de Fungos, Departamento de Micologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. Avenida da Engenharia, s/n, Recife 50740-600, PE, Brazil
2
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Monitoramento Ambiental, Departamento de Engenharia e Meio Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Paraíba. Av. Santa Elisabete, s/n, Centro, Rio Tinto 58297-000, PB, Brazil
3
Departamento de Micologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. Avenida da Engenharia, s/n, Recife 50740-600, PE, Brazil
4
Agroscope, Competence Division for Plants and Plant Products, Ecotoxicology, Müller-Thurgau-Strasse 29, CH-8820 Wädenswil, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(1), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9010052
Received: 20 November 2019 / Revised: 18 December 2019 / Accepted: 29 December 2019 / Published: 1 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contribution of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis to Plant Growth)
Gradual environmental changes are determining factors in the disposition of plants and associated organisms, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The objective of this study was to evaluate the AMF species communities in a tropical semi-arid region of NE Brazil under decreasing clay content at a mountain top area forming a vegetative mosaic of dry forests, savanna-like shrubland and humid montane forests. Through field and trap culture samples, 80 species of AMF were identified belonging to 25 genera, of which Acaulospora and Glomus were the most representative. In general, representatives of the order Gigasporales were indicators of sites with lower clay content and showed greater abundance in these sites. As expected, less richness was found in the site with higher clay content, but there was no variation in the Shannon-Weaver index in the gradient studied. The areas showed different assemblies of AMF among the sites with higher and lower clay content, and the main factors structuring the species were carbon, clay and potential acidity. In addition, field samples and trap cultures showed different assemblies; through the use of cultures it was possible to detect additional species. Soil properties have been found to be determinants for the distribution of these microorganisms and further studies in different vegetation types can help to understand the ecological preferences of AMF species. View Full-Text
Keywords: dry forests; Glomeromycota; edaphic properties; Tropics dry forests; Glomeromycota; edaphic properties; Tropics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vieira, L.C.; Silva, D.K.A.; Escobar, I.E.C.; Silva, J.M.; Moura, I.A.; Oehl, F.; Silva, G.A. Changes in an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Community Along an Environmental Gradient. Plants 2020, 9, 52.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop