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Open AccessArticle

Glucosinolate Distribution in the Aerial Parts of sel1-10, a Disruption Mutant of the Sulfate Transporter SULTR1;2, in Mature Arabidopsis thaliana Plants

1
Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan
2
Department of Bio-Environmental Chemistry, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(4), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8040095
Received: 26 February 2019 / Revised: 3 April 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Sulfur Research)
Plants take up sulfur (S), an essential element for all organisms, as sulfate, which is mainly attributed to the function of SULTR1;2 in Arabidopsis. A disruption mutant of SULTR1;2, sel1-10, has been characterized with phenotypes similar to plants grown under sulfur deficiency (−S). Although the effects of −S on S metabolism were well investigated in seedlings, no studies have been performed on mature Arabidopsis plants. To study further the effects of −S on S metabolism, we analyzed the accumulation and distribution of S-containing compounds in different parts of mature sel1-10 and of the wild-type (WT) plants grown under long-day conditions. While the levels of sulfate, cysteine, and glutathione were almost similar between sel1-10 and WT, levels of glucosinolates (GSLs) differed between them depending on the parts of the plant. GSLs levels in the leaves and stems were generally lower in sel1-10 than those in WT. However, sel1-10 seeds maintained similar levels of aliphatic GSLs to those in WT plants. GSL accumulation in reproductive tissues is likely to be prioritized even when sulfate supply is limited in sel1-10 for its role in S storage and plant defense. View Full-Text
Keywords: mature Arabidopsis thaliana plants; sulfate transporter; SULTR1;2; sel1-10 mutant; glucosinolates mature Arabidopsis thaliana plants; sulfate transporter; SULTR1;2; sel1-10 mutant; glucosinolates
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Morikawa-Ichinose, T.; Kim, S.-J.; Allahham, A.; Kawaguchi, R.; Maruyama-Nakashita, A. Glucosinolate Distribution in the Aerial Parts of sel1-10, a Disruption Mutant of the Sulfate Transporter SULTR1;2, in Mature Arabidopsis thaliana Plants. Plants 2019, 8, 95.

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