Next Article in Journal
Bentonite and Biochar Mitigate Pb Toxicity in Pisum sativum by Reducing Plant Oxidative Stress and Pb Translocation
Previous Article in Journal
Nutritional Value, Mineral Composition, Secondary Metabolites, and Antioxidant Activity of Some Wild Geophyte Sedges and Grasses
Article

Generation of Transgenic Self-Incompatible Arabidopsis thaliana Shows a Genus-Specific Preference for Self-Incompatibility Genes

1
National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, National Center of Rapeseed Improvement in Wuhan, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
2
Department of Cell & Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada
3
Centre for Genome Analysis & Function, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Plants 2019, 8(12), 570; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8120570
Received: 11 September 2019 / Revised: 30 November 2019 / Accepted: 3 December 2019 / Published: 4 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Dynamic Change in Plant Genomes)
Brassicaceae species employ both self-compatibility and self-incompatibility systems to regulate post-pollination events. Arabidopsis halleri is strictly self-incompatible, while the closely related Arabidopsis thaliana has transitioned to self-compatibility with the loss of functional S-locus genes during evolution. The downstream signaling protein, ARC1, is also required for the self-incompatibility response in some Arabidopsis and Brassica species, and its gene is deleted in the A. thaliana genome. In this study, we attempted to reconstitute the SCR-SRK-ARC1 signaling pathway to restore self-incompatibility in A. thaliana using genes from A. halleri and B. napus, respectively. Several of the transgenic A. thaliana lines expressing the A. halleri SCR13-SRK13-ARC1 transgenes displayed self-incompatibility, while all the transgenic A. thaliana lines expressing the B. napus SCR1-SRK1-ARC1 transgenes failed to show any self-pollen rejection. Furthermore, our results showed that the intensity of the self-incompatibility response in transgenic A. thaliana plants was not associated with the expression levels of the transgenes. Thus, this suggests that there are differences between the Arabidopsis and Brassica self-incompatibility signaling pathways, which perhaps points to the existence of other factors downstream of B. napus SRK that are absent in Arabidopsis species. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-incompatible; SCR (S-locus Cysteine-Rich), SRK (S locus receptor kinase), ARC1 (Arm repeat containing), Arabidopsis thaliana; genus-specific preference self-incompatible; SCR (S-locus Cysteine-Rich), SRK (S locus receptor kinase), ARC1 (Arm repeat containing), Arabidopsis thaliana; genus-specific preference
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, T.; Zhou, G.; Goring, D.R.; Liang, X.; Macgregor, S.; Dai, C.; Wen, J.; Yi, B.; Shen, J.; Tu, J.; Fu, T.; Ma, C. Generation of Transgenic Self-Incompatible Arabidopsis thaliana Shows a Genus-Specific Preference for Self-Incompatibility Genes. Plants 2019, 8, 570. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8120570

AMA Style

Zhang T, Zhou G, Goring DR, Liang X, Macgregor S, Dai C, Wen J, Yi B, Shen J, Tu J, Fu T, Ma C. Generation of Transgenic Self-Incompatible Arabidopsis thaliana Shows a Genus-Specific Preference for Self-Incompatibility Genes. Plants. 2019; 8(12):570. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8120570

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhang, Tong, Guilong Zhou, Daphne R. Goring, Xiaomei Liang, Stuart Macgregor, Cheng Dai, Jing Wen, Bin Yi, Jinxiong Shen, Jinxing Tu, Tingdong Fu, and Chaozhi Ma. 2019. "Generation of Transgenic Self-Incompatible Arabidopsis thaliana Shows a Genus-Specific Preference for Self-Incompatibility Genes" Plants 8, no. 12: 570. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8120570

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop